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Vandegrift Combat Base (also known as FSB Vandegrift and LZ Stud) is a former U.S. Army and Marine Corps and Army of the Republic of Vietnam (ARVN) base north of Ca Lu in Quảng Trị Province, Vietnam.

Vandegrift Combat Base
1st Cav at LZ Stud.jpg
April 4, 1968 1st Cavalry forces at LZ Stud
Coordinates16°42′N 106°53′E / 16.7°N 106.88°E / 16.7; 106.88 (Vandegrift Combat Base)
TypeArmy/Marines
Site information
Conditionabandoned
Site history
Built1968
In use1968-71
Battles/warsVietnam Service Medal ribbon.svg
Vietnam War
Garrison information
Occupants1st Cavalry Division
9th Marines
ARVN 2nd Division

HistoryEdit

1968Edit

LZ Stud was originally established by the 1st Cavalry Division on Route 9 in early 1968 to support Operation Pegasus, the relief of Khe Sanh.[1]

The base was later occupied by the 9th Marine Regiment, part of the 3rd Marine Division who renamed it Vandegrift Combat Base after Marine General Alexander Vandegrift.[1][2]

1969Edit

From January–March 1969 Vandegrift was used to support Operation Dewey Canyon an offensive into the A Shau Valley south of the base.

On 9 April 1969 a Marine Sikorsky CH-53A Sea Stallion helicopter (BuNo 153738) of HMH-462 crashed into the ammunition dump at Vandegrift triggering a large fire.[3]

In October 1969 the base was handed over to the ARVN 2nd Division who dismantled it and used it to reinforce Camp Carroll.[1]

1971Edit

In late January 1971 the base was reoccupied by the 1st Brigade, 5th Infantry Division in support of Operation Dewey Canyon II.[2]

During the same period, the base was also occupied by the 1st Battalion, 82nd Field Artillery, 23rd Infantry Division in support of Operation Dewey Canyon II.

Current useEdit

The base is abandoned and turned over to farmland.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c Kelley, Michael (2002). Where we were in Vietnam. Hellgate Press. pp. 5–533. ISBN 978-1555716257.
  2. ^ a b Stanton, Shelby (2003). Vietnam Order of Battle. Stackpole Books. p. 77. ISBN 9780811700719.
  3. ^ "MAG-36 Command Chronology, April 1969" (PDF). U.S. Marine Corps. p. 4. Retrieved 2 November 2014.

  This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the United States Marine Corps.