Umm al-Darda

Umm al-Darda al-Kubra (Arabic: أم الدرداء الكبرى) was a companion of prophet Muhammad. She was a prominent jurist during the 7th century in Damascus.[1] She lectured in the male section of the mosque. As an orphan child, under the sponsorship of Abu Darda, Umm al-Darda prayed shoulder to shoulder with men — a practice which is very rarely seen today — and issued a fatwa, which is still used today allowing women to pray in the same position as men.

One of her students, ʿAbd al-Malik ibn Marwān, was the 5th Umayyad caliph.[2][3] He studied fiqh under Umm al-Darda[4][5] The 14th-century Muslim historian Ibn Khaldun states, "ʿAbd al-Malik ibn Marwan is one of the greatest Arab and Muslim Caliphs. He followed in the footsteps of ʿUmar ibn al-Khattab, the Commander of the Believers, in regulating state affairs."[6]

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ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Suleman, Mehrunisha; Rajbee, Afaaf. "The Lost Female Scholars of Islam". Emel magazine. Emel magazine
  2. ^ Carla Power, "A Secret History", New York Times Magazine, 25 February 2007.
  3. ^ Ato Quayson, Girish Daswani, A Companion to Diaspora and Transnationalism, Chapter 29. ISBN 1118320646.
  4. ^ Suleman, Mehrunisha; Rajbee, Afaaf. "The Lost Female Scholars of Islam". Emel magazine. Emel magazine.
  5. ^ Nadwi, M. A. (2007). Al-Muhaddithat: The Women Scholars in Islam. Interface Publications. ISBN 9780955454516[page needed]
  6. ^ Montefiore, Simon Sebag (2012-05-17). Titans of the Middle East. Quercus Publishing. ISBN 9781743511237.