Open main menu

United Lutheran Church in America

  (Redirected from ULCA)

The United Lutheran Church in America (ULCA) was established in 1918 in commemoration of the 400th anniversary of the Protestant Reformation after negotiations among several American Lutheran national synods resulted in the merger of three German-language synods: the General Synod (founded in 1820), the General Council (1867), and the United Synod of the South (1863). The Slovak Zion Synod (1919) joined the ULCA in 1920. The Icelandic Synod (1885) also joined the United Lutheran Church in America in 1942.

United Lutheran Church in America
ClassificationProtestant
OrientationLutheran
StructureNational church, regional synods, and local congregations
RegionUnited States
Origin1918
Merger ofGeneral Synod
General Council
United Synod of the South
AbsorbedSlovak Zion Synod (1920)
Icelandic Synod (1942)
Merged intoLutheran Church in America (1962)
Congregations4,363 (1961)
Members2,390,075 (1961)
Ministers4,893 (1961)

In 1962, after a five-year merger process, the United Lutheran Church in America became part of the new Lutheran Church in America (LCA). Twenty-six years later, on January 1, 1988, the LCA joined with the American Lutheran Church (1960) and the Association of Evangelical Lutheran Churches, (1978) to form the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, which is today the largest Lutheran church body in the United States.[1]

In 1961, just before its merger into the LCA, the ULCA had 4,893 pastors, 4,363 congregations, and 2,390,075 members.[2]

PresidentsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Histories of bodies that merged to form the ULCA (Evangelical Church in America) "Archived copy". Archived from the original on June 5, 2009. Retrieved June 13, 2009.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  2. ^ "United Lutheran Church in America". American Denomination Profiles. Association of Religion Data Archives. Retrieved February 24, 2016.

Other sourcesEdit

  • Wolf, Edmund Jacob. The Lutherans in America; a story of struggle, progress, influence and marvelous growth (New York: J.A. Hill. 1889)
  • Bente, F. American Lutheranism Volume II (St. Louis: Concordia Publishing House. 1919)
  • Nichol, Todd W. All These Lutherans (Minneapolis: Augsburg Publishers. 1986)