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Tina Keller-Jenny (born June 17, 1887 in Schwanden, Switzerland, died October 25, 1985 in Geneva) was a Swiss physician and Jungian psychotherapist who witnessed firsthand the development of analytical psychology during its formative years.[1]

Tina Keller-Jenny
Tina Keller Jenny.jpg
Born 1887
Zurich
Died 1985
Nationality Swiss
Occupation Physician and Jungian Psychotherapist
Known for Pioneer in integrating analysis with body-based approaches such as movement and dance. Tina Keller was one of the first women in Switzerland to found a psychiatric Jungian practice
Notable work

Aus meinen Errinnerungen an C.G.Jung

Zur Psyche der Frau
Spouse(s) Adolf Keller

BiographyEdit

Tina Keller was the daughter of Swiss industrialist Conrad Jenny, and grew up at the Jenny-Castle, in Thalwil, Switzerland. In 1912 she married the theologian Adolf Keller and was mother of five children. Tina Keller completed many years of analysis with C.G.Jung and Toni Wolff (1915–1928), who discovered movement as active imagination. She completed medical school in 1931, and practiced as a psychiatrist and Jungian-oriented psychotherapist. She was one of the first women in Switzerland to found a psychiatric Jungian practice.[2] Keller-Jenny was one of the pioneers in integrating analysis with body-based approaches such as movement and dance, which has since become a major element in the field of body-sensitive analysis. A Therapy largely unknown until the 1950s when rediscovered by Marian Chace and therapist Mary Whitehouse. Whitehouse later became a dancer and dance teacher having studied with Martha Graham and Mary Wigma.[3]

After the death of her husband Adolf Keller in 1963, Tina Keller worked in a psychiatric hospital in Los Angeles together with Trudi Schoop. Schoop was a dance therapist, dancer and comedian. Back in Switzerland, she was asked to speak on the 10th anniversary of C.G.Jung death. She was by then the last surviving collaborators of C.G.Jung's early years. Until her old age, Tina Keller made therapies, including her grandnephew and painter Daniel Garbade. She wrote books and theses, and died 98 years old in 1985 in Geneva.[4]

LiteratureEdit

  • Tina Keller & Wendy K. Swan: The memoir of Tina Keller-Jenny. A Lifelong Confrontation with the Psychology of C. G. Jung. Spring Journal Books, New Orleans 2009, ISBN 978-18-826-7085-7, OCLC 779060366.
  • [notice biographique, correspondance]. s. n., s. l., 1933–1945, OCLC 716739683.
  • Tina Keller, Aus meinen Erinnerungen an C. G. Jung. Bircher Benner, Erlenbach 1980.
  • Tina Keller, Zur Psyche der Frau. Classen, Zurich 1955.
  • Tina Keller, Das Ja zu sich selber. Bircher Benner, Erlenbach 1980.
  • Marianne Jehle-Wildberger: C. G. Jung und Adolf Keller. Über Theologie und Psychologie. Briefe und Gespräche. Theologischer Verlag, Zürich 2014, ISBN 978-3-290-17770-6, OCLC 992952828.
  • Sonu Shamdasani: Introduction to Jungian Psychology. Princeton University Press, Princeton 2012.
  • Schweizerisches medizinisches Jahrbuch. Schwabe, Basel 1980.

SourcesEdit

  1. ^ Wendy K. Swan: . San Francisco, Kalifornien 2005 (wikispaces.com [PDF; 3,3 MB] Diss. The Faculty of Saybrook Graduate School and Research Center).
  2. ^ Jehle-Wildberger, Marianne (2014). C. G. Jung und Adolf Keller: Über Theologie und Psychologie: Briefe und Gespräche (in German). Zurich: Theologischer Verlag Zürich. p. 65. ISBN 9783290177706.
  3. ^ Pallaro, Patrizia (2007-01-15). Authentic Movement: Moving the Body, Moving the Self, Being Moved: A Collection of Essays - Volume Two. Jessica Kingsley Publishers. ISBN 1846425867.
  4. ^ 1. Obituary, Tina Keller-Jenny. Neue Zürcher Zeitung. Nr. 250, October 28, 1985, page 41.