Thompson v. Hubbard

Thompson v. Hubbard, 131 U.S. 123 (1889), was a United States Supreme Court case in which the Court held that a later owner of a copyright is entitled to sue a previous owner for copyright infringement. However, the later owner's failure to observe formalities voids copyright and a nonexistent copyright cannot be infringed.[1]

Thompson v. Hubbard
Submitted April 17, 1889
Decided May 13, 1889
Full case nameThompson v. Hubbard
Citations131 U.S. 123 (more)
9 S. Ct. 710; 33 L. Ed. 76
Holding
A later owner of a copyright is entitled to sue a previous owner for copyright infringement. However, the later owner's failure to observe formalities voids copyright and a nonexistent copyright cannot be infringed.
Court membership
Chief Justice
Melville Fuller
Associate Justices
Samuel F. Miller · Stephen J. Field
Joseph P. Bradley · John M. Harlan
Horace Gray · Samuel Blatchford
Lucius Q. C. Lamar II
Case opinion
MajorityBlatchford, joined by unanimous

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Thompson v. Hubbard, 131 U.S. 123 (1889)

External linksEdit