Thomas L. Sakmyster

Thomas L. Sakmyster (born 1943) is an American professor emeritus of history of the University of Cincinnati, known for his studies of early 20th-century Hungary, including the "first full-length scholarly study of Hungary's most controversial figure" of the 20th century and the "most important work on the admiral to date", Miklós Horthy, as well as a meticulously-researched even-handed biography of the Hungarian-Soviet spy J. Peters.[1][2][3][4][5][6]

BackgroundEdit

Thomas L. Sakmyster was born in 1943 in Perth Amboy, New Jersey. In 1965, he received a BA from Dartmouth. In 1967, he received an MA and in 1971 a doctorate, both in history, from Indiana University. His dissertation was on Hungary and the Coming of the European Crisis, 1937-1938.[1]

CareerEdit

In 1971, Sakmyster began to teach history at the University of Cincinnati.[1] In 1985, he served as director of graduate studies.[7] As of 1995, he served as Walter Langsam Professor of European History.[1] In 2003, he served as acting chair of History.[8] In 2005, he retired and in 2007 became professor emeritus.[1]

WorksEdit

Sakmyster's works include:

Books:

  • Hungary, the Great Powers, and the Danubian Crisis, 1936-1939 (1980)[9]
  • Hungary's Admiral on Horseback: Miklós Horthy, 1918-1944 (1994)[10]
    • Miklos Horthy: Ungarn 1918-1944 (2006)[11]
  • Red Conspirator: J. Peters and the American Communist Underground (Champaign, IL: University of Illinois Press, 2007)[2][12]
  • A Communist Odyssey: The Life of József Pogány / John Pepper (Central European University Press, 2012)[13]

Articles:

  • "The Hungarian State to Germany of August, 1948: Some New Evidence on Hungary in Hitler's Pre-Munich Policy" Canadian Slavic Studies (1969)
  • "Bethlen István Titkos Iratai, Edited by Miklós Szinai and Laszlo Sziics," Canadian Slavic Studies (1974)[14]
  • "Army Officers and Foreign Policy in Interwar Hungary, 1918-41," Journal of Contemporary History (1975)[15]
  • "From Habsburg Admiral to Hungarian Regent: The Political Metamorphosis of Miklós Horthy 1918–1921," East European Quarterly (1983)[16]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e "About". Thomas Sakmyster. 2013. Retrieved 8 June 2017.
  2. ^ a b "Red Conspirator: J. Peters and the American Communist Underground". University of Illinois Press. 2011. Retrieved 8 June 2017.
  3. ^ "Political Controversy over the Role of Regent Miklós Horthy (1920-1944)". Hungarian Spectrum. 2011. Retrieved 19 April 2020.
  4. ^ Goldberger, Samuel (February 1998). "Goldberger on Sakmyster, 'Hungary's Admiral on Horseback: Miklos Horthy, 1918-1944'". H-NET Habsburg. Retrieved 19 April 2020.
  5. ^ Adams, Jefferson (8 December 2011). "Out of the Shadows". H-NET Habsburg. pp. 191–195. Retrieved 19 April 2020.
  6. ^ Essays on Hitler's Europe. University of Nebraska Press. 8 December 2011. p. 148. Retrieved 19 April 2020.
  7. ^ Guide to Departments of History. American Historical Association. 1985. p. 74. Retrieved 19 April 2020.
  8. ^ Directory of History Departments, Historical Organizations, and Historians. American Historical Association. 2003. p. 97. Retrieved 19 April 2020.
  9. ^ Sakmyster, Thomas L. (1980). "Hungary, the Great Powers, and the Danubian Crisis, 1936-1939". University of Georgia Press. Retrieved 19 April 2020. Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  10. ^ Sakmyster, Thomas L. (1994). "Hungary's Admiral on Horseback: Miklós Horthy, 1918-1944". Columbia University Press: 476. Retrieved 19 April 2020. Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  11. ^ Sakmyster, Thomas L. (2006). "Miklos Horthy: Ungarn 1918-1944". Edition Steinbauer: 455. Retrieved 19 April 2020. Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  12. ^ Sakmyster, Thomas L. (25 April 2011). "UC History Professor Goes on the Hunt for Hungarian Communist". University of Cincinnati. Retrieved 19 April 2020.
  13. ^ "Thomas Sakmyster". CEU Press. 2012. Retrieved 3 September 2018.
  14. ^ Sakmyster, Thomas L. (January 1974). "Bethlen István Titkos Iratai, Edited by Miklós Szinai and Laszlo Sziics". Canadian Slavic Studies: 161–162. Retrieved 19 April 2020.
  15. ^ Sakmyster, Thomas L. (1975). "Army Officers and Foreign Policy in Interwar Hungary, 1918-41". Journal of Contemporary History: 19–40. Retrieved 19 April 2020.
  16. ^ Sakmyster, Thomas L. (June 1983). "From Habsburg Admiral to Hungarian Regent: The Political Metamorphosis of Miklós Horthy 1918–1921". East European Quarterly: 129–148.

External sourcesEdit