Thomas Hungerford (Australian politician)

Thomas Hungerford (6 September 1823 – 4 May 1904) was a pioneer pastoralist and politician in Australia. He was a Member of the New South Wales Legislative Assembly.[1]

Thomas Hungerford

Early lifeEdit

Hungerford was born near Cork to Captain Emanuel Hungerford and Catherine Loan(e). The family migrated to New South Wales in 1828, and his father settled on the Hunter River. Hungerford became a pastoralist, owning property near Walgett and inheriting his father's Hunter property in 1852. On 19 June 1852 he married Emma Hollingsworth Wood, with whom he had nine children; a second marriage to Catherine Mary Mallon produced six children.

PoliticsEdit

He first stood as a candidate for the New South Wales Legislative Assembly for Upper Hunter at the election for The Upper Hunter, but was unsuccessful, finishing second behind Francis White with a margin of 342 votes (26.6%).[2] White died 6 months later and Hungerford won the resulting by-election,[2] however the by-election was overturned by the Election and Qualifications Committee on the basis that two polls were taken at Belltrees.[3] A second by-election was held in August 1875, however Hungerford was defeated.[2] He was elected to Northumberland at the 1877 election,[4] but he resigned in 1880.[1] He was re-elected at the 1882 by-election, but decided to contest The Upper Hunter at the 1882 election, but finished last on the poll.[2] He was elected again for Upper Hunter at the 1885 election, but he was defeated for a final time in 1887, although he continued to contest elections until 1894.[5]

Later lifeEdit

Hungerford was ruined by the 1890s depression, and by 1900 had lost all his property. He died at Ashfield in 1904.[6]

LegacyEdit

The town of Hungerford, Queensland was named after him.[7]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Ellis, Ian. "Hungerford, Thomas (1823–1904)". Australian Dictionary of Biography. Melbourne University Press. ISSN 1833-7538. Retrieved 27 October 2014 – via National Centre of Biography, Australian National University.
  2. ^ a b c d Green, Antony. "Elections for the District of Upper Hunter". New South Wales Election Results 1856-2007. Parliament of New South Wales. Retrieved 25 November 2019.
  3. ^ "The Upper Hunter election". The Evening News. 12 July 1875. p. 2. Retrieved 26 November 2019 – via Trove.
  4. ^ Green, Antony. "Elections for the District of Northumberland". New South Wales Election Results 1856-2007. Parliament of New South Wales. Retrieved 16 October 2020.
  5. ^ Green, Antony. "Index to Candidates: Hua to Jacobi". New South Wales Election Results 1856-2007. Parliament of New South Wales. Retrieved 30 May 2021.
  6. ^ "Mr Thomas Hungerford (1823-1904)". Former members of the Parliament of New South Wales. Retrieved 23 June 2019.
  7. ^ "Hungerford". Bulloo Shire Council. Retrieved 26 October 2014.

 

New South Wales Legislative Assembly
Preceded by Member for Upper Hunter
1875
Succeeded by
Preceded by Member for Northumberland
1877–1880
Succeeded by
Preceded by Member for Northumberland
1882
Served alongside: Ninian Melville
Succeeded by
Preceded by Member for Upper Hunter
1885–1887
Served alongside: Robert Fitzgerald
Succeeded by