The Source of the Loue

The Source of the Loue is the name of several mid-19th century paintings by French artist Gustave Courbet. Done in oil on canvas, the paintings depict the river Loue in eastern France.

The Source of the Loue
The Source of the Loue MET DT1964.jpg
One of Courbet's series (99.7 x 142.2 cm, oil on canvas) in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.
ArtistGustave Courbet
Year1863–64
MediumOil on canvas
LocationVarious

DescriptionEdit

An artist with naturalist and Realism proclivities, Gustave Courbet often painted the river Loue near Ornans, his hometown in eastern France. From 1863 to 1864, he painted a series of four paintings titled The Source of the Loue. The paintings depict rocky crags and grottos with the river flowing beneath them, a motif in keeping with Courbet's earlier works of Realism. All of the paintings showcase Courbet's skill in using a palette knife to apply pigment.[1]

At the time of their creation, the paintings (along with other works by Courbet) were not widely accepted in the art community as they were considered works of Realism, then a fringe artistic movement.[2]

PaintingsEdit

Courbet's series is now split between the collection of several institutions. One painting is in the collection of the Walters Museum, one is in the collection of the Kunsthaus Zürich,[3] one is in the collection of the Kunsthalle Hamburg, and one is in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.[1]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "The Source of the Loue". www.metmuseum.org. Retrieved 2020-08-22. Some of the information provided by the source is provided via an audio file{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: postscript (link) CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  2. ^ N.Y.), Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York (1987). Europe in the Age of Enlightenment and Revolution. Metropolitan Museum of Art. p. 17. ISBN 978-0-87099-451-7.
  3. ^ "Web Gallery of Art, searchable fine arts image database". www.wga.hu. Retrieved 2020-08-22.