The National Trust (band)

The National Trust is a Philadelphia soul, neo soul[1] musical project formed in 1999 in Chicago, Illinois.[2]

The National Trust
OriginChicago, Illinois, United States
GenresPhiladelphia soul, neo soul
Years active1999–present
LabelsThrill Jockey
Associated actsDolomite, Fifteen Couples
Websitetrustmusics
MembersNeil Rosario
Mark Henning
Past membersAndy Cunningham
Doug DeMers
Bryan Aldrin
Colin Studybaker

HistoryEdit

While only officially formed in the late 1990s, The National Trust can trace its history back to 1990 through band leader, composer and guitarist Neil Rosario's previous bands Dolomite and Fifteen Couples.

After the breakup of Fifteen Couples in 1999, Rosario teamed up with Andy Cunningham (ex-Fifteen Couples guitarist), Doug Demers (ex-Dolomite bassist), vocalist/guitarist Mark Henning (ex-Zoom), and Bryan Aldrin. While still working on material the band signed with record label Thrill Jockey, which released their first song "Make It Happen". They then entered Chicago's Clava studios with producer Brian Deck to begin recording their debut album.[1]

In June 2002, after Rosario returned to Chicago from his father's funeral in Las Vegas, he and Deck spent what has been reported as 500 hours in the studio putting the finishing touches to their debut album Dekkagar,[1][3] which was released on April 9, 2002.

The National Trust's second album Kings and Queens was released on January 24, 2006.

DiscographyEdit

DekkagarEdit

Dekkagar
 
Studio album by
The National Trust
ReleasedApril 9, 2002
GenrePhili soul, neo soul, indie pop
Length51:54
LabelThrill Jockey
ProducerBrian Deck, Neil Rosario
The National Trust chronology
Dekkagar
(2002)
Kings and Queens
(2006)
Dekkagar
Review scores
SourceRating
Allmusic      link
Pitchfork Media(6.9/10) link

The National Trust's debut album Dekkagar was released on April 9, 2002 by Thrill Jockey Records to generally positive reviews.

Track listingEdit

All tracks are written by Rosario.

No.TitleLength
1."Making Love (In the Natural Light)"11:07
2."Feather Clip"4:00
3."Neverstop"5:02
4."See No Evil"6:36
5."Lachrymosa"4:15
6."So Anna"4:24
7."From Seven to Mars"5:28
8."Mrs. Turner"4:10
9."First Time That"6:52
Total length:51:54

Kings and QueensEdit

Kings and Queens
 
Studio album by
The National Trust
ReleasedJanuary 24, 2006
GenrePhili soul, neo soul, indie pop
Length53:49
LabelThrill Jockey
ProducerAbel Garibaldi, Neil Rosario, Mark Henning, Van Christie
The National Trust chronology
Dekkagar
(2002)
Kings and Queens
(2006)
Kings and Queens
Review scores
SourceRating
Allmusic      link
Dusted Magazine(mixed) link
Pitchfork Media(4.4/10) link
Prefix Magazine           link
Scissorkick(favorable) link
Tiny Mix Tapes(favorable) link
Yahoo! Music           link

Kings and Queens was The National Trust's second full-length album. It was released on January 24, 2006 by Thrill Jockey Records. While most reviews were favourable, most commented on the over production of the overall sound; Clearly, these boys can't grasp the concept of "say when" from Pitchfork Media.[4] A majority of the tracks lack in everything but production value from Prefix Magazine.[5]

Track listingEdit

All tracks are written by Henning, Rosario, except where noted.

No.TitleLength
1."Elevators"4:14
2."Secrets"5:38
3."It's Just Cruel"5:36
4."Canday's Away"5:14
5."Stages"5:17
6."We Can't Do Wrong"6:10
7."Jacuzzis" (Henning, Hypnotic, Rosario)3:49
8."Show and Tell"6:05
9."New Sexy Touch"6:33
10."Shapes and Sizes"5:13
Total length:53:49

TelevisionEdit

The O.C.

  • Episode - "The Undertow"

The Gilmore Girls

  • Episode -

Road Rules

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c Ankeny, Jason. "National Trust Biography". Allmusic. Retrieved 21 May 2009.
  2. ^ "National Trust Biography". NME. Retrieved 21 May 2009.[dead link]
  3. ^ Tangari, Joe (June 30, 2002). "Dekkagar review". Pitchfork Media. Retrieved 21 May 2009.
  4. ^ Dombal, Ryan (February 26, 2006). "Kings and Queens review". Pitchfork Media. Retrieved 21 May 2009.
  5. ^ Easley, Jonathan (January 30, 2006). "Kings and Queens review". Prefix Magazine. Retrieved 21 May 2009.

External linksEdit