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The Lost Files of Sherlock Holmes: The Case of the Rose Tattoo

The Lost Files of Sherlock Holmes: The Case of the Rose Tattoo is a 1996 graphic adventure game developed by Mythos Software and published by Electronic Arts.

The Lost Files of Sherlock Holmes: The Case of the Rose Tattoo
Developer(s)Mythos Software
Publisher(s)Electronic Arts
Platform(s)Windows
ReleaseSeptember 27, 1996[1]
Genre(s)Graphic adventure

Contents

PlotEdit

Holmes' brother Mycroft is caught in an explosion when his club, the Diogenes, is blown up. The player, first as Doctor Watson and then as Sherlock Holmes, investigates the explosion and discovers that it was not a gas leak but a bomb which was the cause. This leads them to investigate a case of espionage and the strange death of an unidentified man. In this game, establishing the identity of the victim is as important as finding out who killed him. The intricate plot leads the player to a great number of locations over town and involves several subplots.

DevelopmentEdit

The characters in the game were made by filming real actors in costume, against a bluescreen. While the characters are thus more lifelike, Rose Tattoo did not display large, high-quality faces shown during dialogues in the first game. A similar use of in-game video can also be found in e.g. Jones in the Fast Lane and Under a Killing Moon and in retrospect appears as a transient trend permitted by the available hardware. The CD-ROM greatly increased the data storage space available to a computer game. Most games of this period filled the empty space by enhancing the game with digitized speech and cut-scene videos. Later, advances in CPU and graphic card hardware allowed high-resolution characters to be rendered in 3D.

The game is longer than its predecessor and features a much higher degree of historical accuracy and detail. The graphics are near-photo quality and the atmospheric sounds more are realistic, while the background music, which communicated the mood of the scenes in the first game, is applied less in the Rose Tattoo. Unlike the previous game, digitized speech is employed throughout the game and adds characterization to the NPCs.

A partial list of the Development Team:

Original Concept: R.J. Berg. Software Design: John Dunn and James Ferguson. Development Lead: David Wood. Level Developers: Troy Harris and Matt Stenger. Graphics & Animation: Mike Flores, Dan Lyons, Hans Homberg, Thaddeus Neal, Jaime Velasquez, Juan Villescas and Chris Wood. Video and Visual Effects: Greg Humphrey, Miles Marshall, James Dunn and Judy Wood. Music and Sound: Rob Hubbard, Marshall Crutcher, Marc Farley and David Whittaker. Testing Director: Kurt Hsu.

A partial list of the Cast:

Sherlock Holmes (Video): George W. Gregg. Sherlock Holmes (Voice): Jarion Monroe. Dr. Watson (Video): Matt Stenger. Dr. Watson (Voice): Roger Labon Jackson. Mycroft Holmes (Video): Walter Wood. Professor Moriarty (Video): George W. Gregg. Mrs. Hudson (Voice): Coralie Presie. Wiggins (Voice): Paul Vincent Black. St. Bart’s Hospital Matron (Video): Marcelle Martin. Dr. McCabe the Coroner (Video): Scott Leitch. Scotland Yard Desk Sergeant (Video): Troy Martin. Sleepy Guard: James Dunn. Three-Card Monty Hand Double: John Dunn.

ReceptionEdit

Reception
Review scores
PublicationScore
PC Gamer (US)80%[2]
PC Zone70/100[3]
PC GamesA-[4]
Computer Games Strategy Plus     [5]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ https://web.archive.org/web/19980207215839/http://ogr.com:80/news/news0996.html
  2. ^ Howie, Lisa M. (December 1996). "Lost Files of Sherlock Holmes: Case of the Rose Tattoo". PC Gamer US. Archived from the original on March 5, 2000.
  3. ^ Brooker, Charlie (February 1997). "Pick n Mix; The Lost Files of Sherlock Holmes: Case of the Rose Tattoo". PC Zone (47): 85.
  4. ^ Olafson, Peter. "The Lost Files of Sherlock Holmes: Case of the Rose Tattoo". PC Games. Archived from the original on May 25, 1997.
  5. ^ Royal, Tim (November 16, 1996). "The Lost Files of Sherlock Holmes: The Case of the Rose Tattoo". Computer Games Strategy Plus. Archived from the original on October 7, 1997.

External linksEdit