The Island Princess (film)

The Island Princess (Italian: La principessa delle Canarie) is a 1954 Italian-Spanish comedy film directed by Paolo Moffa.[1]

The Island Princess
Directed byPaolo Moffa
Carlos Serrano de Osma
Written byJuan del Río Ayala
StarringSilvana Pampanini
Music byFranco Ferrara
CinematographyEnzo Serafin
Edited byEraldo Da Roma
Release date
  • 1954 (1954)
Running time
83 minutes
CountriesItaly
Spain
LanguageItalian

PlotEdit

The story takes place in 15th-century Spain. Canarian forces rise against Castille. Backup troops arrive on the island of Gran Canaria for aid due to the rising power of the Grancanarians. However opinions about the war differ in the royal class. Guanarteme the king and his daughter want peace. On the other hand, the warrior leader and the high priest want war.

One day, Castillian officer Don Hernán falls in love with the king's daughter, despite the difference in their status. The high priest poisons the king fatally, and then tries to marry the princess. Soon after, the embassy of Castille, including Don Hernán, arrives for the peace. His confession of love in his camp causes war.

The princess and the high priest marry, despite the Castillian troops advancing. The princess runs away with the high priest to the mountains of Tirma. Don Hernán follows them and does not let the princess fall off the cliffs with the high priest. However, she is disgusted by him and utters the torn Guanche oath.

CastEdit

ProductionEdit

The film was shot in the Canary Islands. Subsequently, Mastroiani recalled the shooting: “Hellish heat! And then there are weapons, horses, and everything else that I have never dealt with. Moreover, these horses (which I gave to the “princess” on behalf of the King of Spain) had neither tails, nor manes, so they had to fix them with ropes. Crazy work! .. "[2]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "The Complete Index To World Film: The Island Princess". CITWF.com. Retrieved 15 March 2009.
  2. ^ "Марчелло Мастроянни. Я помню, да, я помню". Искусство кино (in Russian). Retrieved 25 September 2019.

External linksEdit