Switzerland in the Eurovision Song Contest 2009

  (Redirected from The Highest Heights)

Switzerland competed in the Eurovision Song Contest 2009. The Swiss broadcaster, SRG SSR idée suisse, internally selected Lovebugs to represent the country with the song "The Highest Heights".[1][2][3] The song did not progress from the first semi-final of the competition.

Eurovision Song Contest 2009
Country  Switzerland
National selection
Selection processInternal selection
Selection date(s)Artist: 19 January 2009
Song: 23 February 2009
Selected entrantLovebugs
Selected song"The Highest Heights"
Selected songwriter(s)
  • Adrian Sieber
  • Thomas Rechberger
  • Florian Senn
Finals performance
Semi-final resultFailed to qualify (14th)
Switzerland in the Eurovision Song Contest
◄2008 2009 2010►

BackgroundEdit

Switzerland debuted at Eurovision at the first contest in 1956,[4] and sent its 50th entry to the 2009 contest. Prior to the 2009 contest the country has won the contest twice: their first win occurred at the very first contest, when Lys Assia won for Switzerland with "Refrain" when the contest was held in Switzerland, in the town of Lugano; their second and latest win to date came in 1988, when Canadian singer Céline Dion won with "Ne partez pas sans moi". The country, however, had also come last in the contest on five occasions: in 1964, 1967, 1974, 1998 and in the semi-final of the 2004 contest.[5]

The Swiss broadcaster SRG SSR idée suisse has been in charge of the Swiss Eurovision entry since its interception. In the past the organisation has held a national final to select the Swiss entry to Eurovision, with each regional broadcaster entering songs to the contest. Since 2005, however, the organisation had held an internal selection for the Swiss Eurovision entry, which was continued for the 2009 selection.

Before EurovisionEdit

Internal selectionEdit

Swiss-German broadcaster Schweizer Fernsehen (SF) opened a submission period for interested artists and songwriters to submit their entries between 11 July 2008 and 20 October 2008, announcing that they are looking for "a strong song of an international standard".[6] Composers and artists of any nationality were able to submit songs; however, only artists that have had television and stage experience (live performances), have made at least one video and have released at least one CD which placed among the top 50 in an official chart were eligible. SF also directly invited artists and composers to submit songs.[7] 55 entries were submitted following the submission deadline, and a 5-member jury panel evaluated the entry submissions received and selected the winner.[8]

In January 2009, Swiss newspaper Blick claimed that the popular Swiss band Lovebugs had been selected as the Swiss entrant at the 2009 contest, which was confirmed by SF on 19 January 2009.[9][10][11][12] Their song "The Highest Heights" was released on 23 February 2009.[1][2][3] Before the release of the song, a poll on radio station DRS' website also showed that readers preferred "The Highest Heights" over other songs on their new album of the same name.[13]

At EurovisionEdit

Since Switzerland is not one of the "Big Four" and is not the host of the 2009 contest, it had to compete in one of the two semi-finals. The song competed in the first semi-final but failed to reach the final.[14]

VotingEdit

Points awarded to SwitzerlandEdit

Points awarded to Switzerland (Semi-final 1)[15]
Score Country
12 points
10 points
8 points
7 points
6 points
5 points   Finland
4 points
3 points
2 points
1 point

Points awarded by SwitzerlandEdit

Detailed voting resultsEdit

Detailed voting results from Switzerland (Final)[17][18]
Draw Country Results Points
Jury Televoting Combined
01   Lithuania
02   Israel 5 5 1
03   France 10 1 11 7
04   Sweden 4 4
05   Croatia 4 4
06   Portugal 7 8 15 10
07   Iceland 6 2 8 5
08   Greece 5 5 2
09   Armenia 2 2
10   Russia
11   Azerbaijan
12   Bosnia and Herzegovina 7 7 4
13   Moldova 1 1
14   Malta
15   Estonia 3 3
16   Denmark
17   Germany
18   Turkey 8 12 20 12
19   Albania 10 10 6
20   Norway 12 3 15 8
21   Ukraine
22   Romania
23   United Kingdom
24   Finland
25   Spain 6 6 3

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Siim, Jarmo (2009-02-23). "Lovebugs go to 'highest heights'". EBU. Retrieved 2009-03-01.
  2. ^ a b Costa, Nelson (2009-03-01). "'The Highest Heights' by Lovebugs in Moscow". Oikotimes. Retrieved 2009-03-01.
  3. ^ a b Jiandani, Sanjay (2009-02-23). "Switzerland: Lovebugs to sing The highest heights". ESCToday. Retrieved 2009-03-01.
  4. ^ Staff. "Eurovision Song Contest 1956 – Year page – Eurovision Song Contest - Moscow 2009". EBU. Retrieved 2009-03-01.
  5. ^ Staff. "History by Country: Switzerland". EBU. Retrieved 2009-03-01.
  6. ^ Konstantopoulos, Fotis (2008-07-15). "SF engages Eurovision quest for 2009 entry". Oikotimes. Archived from the original on 2008-12-16. Retrieved 2008-07-15.
  7. ^ Hondal, Víctor (2008-07-16). "Switzerland: SF call for songs". ESCToday. Retrieved 2008-07-16.
  8. ^ "Switzerland 2009". ESCKAZ.
  9. ^ van Tongeren, Mario (2009-01-18). "Local newspaper claims: Lovebugs to Moscow!". Oikotimes. Archived from the original on 2009-07-08. Retrieved 2009-01-18.
  10. ^ Grillhofer, Florian (2009-01-18). "Switzerland sends Lovebugs to Eurovision?". ESCToday. Retrieved 2009-01-18.
  11. ^ Schlup, Claudia (2009-01-18). "Lovebugs am Eurovision Song Contest!". Blick (in German). Retrieved 2009-01-18.
  12. ^ Schacht, Andreas (2009-01-19). "Lovebugs for Switzerland!". Eurovision.tv. Retrieved 2009-01-19.
  13. ^ "Eure Meinung: Lovebugs sollen mit "The Highest Heights" ins Eurovision-Rennen" (in German). DRS1. 2009-01-23. Retrieved 2009-01-25.
  14. ^ "First Semi-Final of Moscow 2009". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 25 April 2021. Retrieved 25 April 2021.
  15. ^ a b "Results of the First Semi-Final of Moscow 2009". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 26 April 2021. Retrieved 26 April 2021.
  16. ^ "Results of the Grand Final of Moscow 2009". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 26 April 2021. Retrieved 26 April 2021.
  17. ^ Bakker, Sietse (31 July 2009). "Exclusive: Split jury/televoting results out!". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 5 June 2011. Retrieved 25 April 2021.
  18. ^ "Eurovision Song Contest 2009 - Full Results". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original (XLS) on 6 June 2011.

External linksEdit