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The Glitter Dome is a 1984 American made-for-HBO crime drama film starring James Garner, Margot Kidder and John Lithgow. The film, based on the 1981 Joseph Wambaugh Hollywood-set homicide novel, was directed by Stuart Margolin, who also scored the film and played a supporting part. The movie was filmed in Victoria, British Columbia and co-starred Colleen Dewhurst. It was subsequently released on video in 1985.[1] The film was also the last film for John Marley.

The Glitter Dome
GarnerKidderGlitter.jpg
theatrical poster
GenreComedy
Crime
Drama
Based onthe novel by Joseph Wambaugh
Written byJoseph Wambaugh
Screenplay byStanley Kalis
Directed byStuart Margolin
StarringJames Garner
Margot Kidder
John Lithgow
Music byStuart Margolin
Country of originUnited States
Original language(s)English
Production
Producer(s)Frank Konigsberg
Production location(s)Vancouver
Victoria, British Columbia
CinematographyMichael W. Watkins
Jon Kranhouse
Editor(s)M.S. Martin
Running time97 minutes
Production company(s)HBO Premiere Films
Telepictures Productions
DistributorWarner Bros. Television
Release
Original networkHBO
Picture formatColor
Audio formatMono
Original release
  • November¬†18,¬†1984¬†(1984-11-18)

SynopsisEdit

The Glitter Dome is a bar frequented by the Hollywood police detective division (the name is a slang reference to Hollywood). When the investigation of a high-profile studio president is going nowhere, the case is handed over to two experienced detectives, Al Mackey (Garner) and Marty Welborn (Lithgow). For this case, however, they need help, which they receive from a pair of vice cops called the Ferret and the Weasel and a pair of street cops commonly referred to as the Street Monsters, due to their fondness for violence.

CastEdit

ControversyEdit

When first telecast on November 18, 1984, The Glitter Dome was criticized for a brief bondage sequence involving Margot Kidder: in retrospect, however, "the scene serves to affirm the integrity and decency of the character played by James Garner".[2]

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