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The Common Review

The Common Review is the online literary magazine of the Great Books Foundation.[1]

The Common Review
Commonreviewwin08.jpg
TypeQuarterly literary journal
FormatMagazine
Owner(s)Great Books Foundation
EditorDaniel Born
Danny Postel
FoundedFall 2001
Ceased publicationFall/Winter 2011 (print)
HeadquartersChicago, Illinois
United States
Websitethecommonreview.org

History and profileEdit

The Common Review was started as a quarterly publication in Fall 2001.[2] The founder was the former Great Books Foundation president Peter Temes.[2] The magazine specializes in nonfiction essays and articles "about the books and ideas that matter",[3] as well as reviews of new books, letters, and editorials.

Daniel Born was the launching editor of the magazine.[2] He served in the post until the Fall 2010 issue when Danny Postel was named new editor.[4] Jason A. Smith was managing editor from 2001 until 2008, when he became editor of Wisconsin People & Ideas, the quarterly magazine of the Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts & Letters[5]. Some of the notable writers and poets featured in the magazine have included Gerald Graff, Nat Hentoff, Phillip Lopate, Joseph Epstein, Carl Rakosi, David Sloan Wilson, Julia Kasdorf, and Michael Bérubé.

The magazine has been twice nominated for the Utne Independent Press Awards, in 2003 (Arts/Literary coverage), and in 2006 ("Best Writing").[citation needed] The magazine ended the print quarterly edition with the Fall/Winter 2011 issue and went on online.[1]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Jerome Ludwig (March 28, 2011). "The Common Review Is Ceasing Print Publication, Going Online Only". Chicago Reader. Retrieved December 31, 2016.
  2. ^ a b c Jerome Ludwig (May 15, 2003). "Who're You Calling Stodgy?". Chicago Reader. Retrieved December 31, 2016.
  3. ^ The Common Review: The Common Review
  4. ^ Alex Alvarez (August 18, 2010). "The Common Review Gets A New Editor". Adweek. Retrieved December 31, 2016.
  5. ^ Smith, Jason. "Editor". Wiscosnin Academy of Sciences, Arts & Letters. Retrieved 16 February 2019.

External linksEdit