Thalia (Grace)

In Greek mythology and religion, Thalia or Thaleia (/ˈθlɪə/[1] or /θəˈlə/;[2] Ancient Greek: Θάλεια Tháleia "the joyous, the abundance") was one of the three Charites, referred to as the Gratiae (Graces) within ancient Rome, along with her sisters Aglaea and Euphrosyne.[3]

Thalia
Goddess of festivity and rich banquets
Member of The Charites
Thalia at Corfu 1.jpg
A statue of Thalia in Achilleion palace, Corfu.
AffiliationAphrodite
Major cult centreBoeotia
AbodeMount Olympus
Personal information
ParentsZeus and Eurynome
SiblingsEuphrosyne and Aglaea

FamilyEdit

Typically, they were the daughters of Zeus and Oceanid Eurynome.[3] Alternative parentage may be Zeus and Eurydome, Eurymedousa, or Euanthe; Dionysus and Kronois; or Helios and the Naiad Aegle.[4][5][6]

MythologyEdit

In art, they were usually depicted dancing in a circle. Thalia was the goddess of festivity and rich banquets and was associated with Aphrodite as part of her retinue.[7][8] The Greek word thalia is an adjective applied to banquets, meaning rich, plentiful, luxuriant and abundant.

In popular cultureEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ http://www.oed.com/view/Entry/200089
  2. ^ https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/Thalia
  3. ^ a b Hesiod, Theogony, 907
  4. ^ Cornutus, Compendium of Greek Theology, 15
  5. ^ Nonnus, Dionysiaca, 15.87 & 48.530
  6. ^ Pausanias, Description of Greece, 9.35.5
  7. ^ Homeric Hymn 5 to Aphrodite, 58
  8. ^ Homer, Iliad, 8.360-369
  9. ^ Stephenson, Neal (1995). The diamond age or, Young lady’s illustrated primer. New York, NY: Bantam Spectra. pp. 240 & 283. ISBN 0-553-09609-5.
  10. ^ "Thalia Grace". Rick Riordan. Retrieved March 24, 2020.

ReferencesEdit