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Terrance P. Gore (born June 8, 1991) is an American professional baseball left fielder who is a free agent. He has played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Chicago Cubs and the Kansas City Royals.

Terrance Gore
Terrance Gore on January 29, 2015.jpg
Gore with the Kansas City Royals in 2015
Free agent
Left fielder / Pinch runner
Born: (1991-06-08) June 8, 1991 (age 28)
Macon, Georgia
Bats: Right Throws: Right
MLB debut
August 31, 2014, for the Kansas City Royals
MLB statistics
(through 2019 season)
Batting average.224
Home runs0
Runs batted in1
Stolen bases40
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Amateur careerEdit

Originally from Macon, Georgia, Gore attended Jones County High School in Gray, Georgia, where he starred in baseball and football as a running back and wide receiver. During his senior year, Gore compiled over 1,000 rushing yards and averaged over nine yards per carry. During his four years playing baseball at the school, he stole 145 bases and hit .474 as a senior. Gore later attended Gulf Coast Community College in Panama City, Florida, turning down football scholarships from the University of Georgia and Georgia Tech.[1] Gore spent one season at Gulf Coast, hitting .330 and had 51 steals in 54 attempts.[2]

Professional careerEdit

Kansas City RoyalsEdit

Gore was drafted by the Kansas City Royals in the 20th round of the 2011 Major League Baseball Draft out of Gulf Coast Community College.[3]

On August 31, 2014, Gore was promoted to the Royals.[4] Gore is the 16th player in Major League Baseball history to wear No. 0. He is the second Royal to wear the number after George Scott, Jr.[5] He was used primarily as a designated pinch runner.[6]

Gore appeared on the 2015 ALDS and 2015 ALCS roster for the Royals, but not the World Series roster. Regardless, Gore received his first World Series ring for his performance in the playoffs.

He was non-tendered by the Royals on December 1, 2017, and signed a minor league contract with them the following day.[7]

Chicago CubsEdit

On August 15, 2018, Gore was traded to the Chicago Cubs in exchange for cash considerations, and assigned to the Triple-A Iowa Cubs.[8] He was promoted to the major leagues on September 1, 2018. On September 8, he recorded his first major league hit in the first game of a double header against the Washington Nationals.[9] He became a free agent after the 2018 season.[10]

Return to Kansas CityEdit

On December 18, 2018, Gore signed a one-year contract to return to the Royals.[11] He was designated for assignment on July 12, 2019 despite hitting .275 with 13 stolen bases.

New York YankeesEdit

On July 17, 2019, Gore was traded to the New York Yankees for cash considerations. He was not added to the 40-man roster and was sent to the Yankees AAA affiliate.[12] He became a free agent following the 2019 season.[13]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Meet the fastest man in baseball: Royals pinch-run specialist Terrance Gore".
  2. ^ Andrew (23 July 2012). "The Baseball Historian: Royals Terrance Gore Trying to Speed His Way Through Minors".
  3. ^ Gore drafted, signs with Kansas City Royals Archived 2014-08-26 at the Wayback Machine
  4. ^ "Royals to add three as September callups".
  5. ^ "MLB Players Who Wore Number 0 - Baseball-Reference.com". Baseball-Reference.com.
  6. ^ "Jarrod Dyson activated off disabled list". MLB.com.
  7. ^ Downing, Kyle (December 2, 2017). "Minor MLB Transactions: 12/2/17". mlbtraderumors.com. Retrieved December 2, 2017.
  8. ^ Todd, Jeff (August 15, 2018). "Cubs Acquire Terrance Gore". mlbtraderumors.com. Retrieved August 15, 2018.
  9. ^ "After five years in majors, Terrance Gore got his first major league hit". 9 September 2018.
  10. ^ Eddy, Matt (November 6, 2018). "Minor League Free Agents 2018". Baseball America. Retrieved November 8, 2018.
  11. ^ http://www.espn.com/mlb/story/_/id/25568448/kansas-city-royals-sign-terrance-gore-split-contract-next-season
  12. ^ "Yankees acquire OF Terrance Gore from Kansas City". MLB.com. July 17, 2019.
  13. ^ Matt Eddy (November 7, 2019). "Minor League Free Agents 2019". Baseball America. Retrieved November 7, 2019.

External linksEdit