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A temper is a non-plastic material added to clay to prevent shrinkage and cracking during drying and firing of vessels made from the clay.[1] Tempers may include:

Some clays used to make pottery do not require the addition of tempers. Pure kaolin clay does not require tempering.[5] Some clays are self-tempered, that is, naturally contain enough mica, sand, or sponge spicules that they do not require additional tempering.[12][11]

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CitationsEdit

  1. ^ a b c "Ceramics". Mississippi Valley Archaeology Center – Technologies. University of Wisconsin – La Crosse. Archived from the original on 14 April 2019. Retrieved 4 November 2011.
  2. ^ a b Stilborg, Ole (1 December 2001). "Temper for the Sake of Coherence: Analyses of Bone- and Chaff-Tempered Ceramics from Iron Age Scandinavia". European Journal of Archaeology. Maney Publishing. 4 (3): 398–404. doi:10.1177/146195710100400316. ISSN 1461-9571.
  3. ^ Silverman & Isbell 2008, p. 439.
  4. ^ a b c Marcondes Lima da Costa; Dirse Clara Kern; Alice Helena Eleotério Pinto; Jorge Raimundo da Trindade Souza (2004). "The ceramic artifacts in archaeological black earth (terra preta) from lower Amazon region, Brazil: Mineralogy". Acta Amazonica. 34 (2): 165. doi:10.1590/S0044-59672004000200004.
  5. ^ a b c Berlo, Janet Catherine; Phillips, Ruth Bliss (1998). Native North American Art. Oxford University Press. p. 56. ISBN 978-0-19-284218-3.
  6. ^ a b Weinstein & Dumas 2008, p. 203.
  7. ^ Silverman & Isbell 2008, p. 307.
  8. ^ Watters 1997, pp. 92-94.
  9. ^ Milanich 1994, p. 86.
  10. ^ Silverman & Isbell 2008, p. 369.
  11. ^ a b "Woodland Period - St. Johns Cultures - 500 BC to 1500 AD". Pelotes Island Nature Preserve. Archived from the original on 6 March 2015. Retrieved 14 April 2019.
  12. ^ Wilson, C. Dean (2014). "Taos Black-on-White". New Mexico Office of Archaeological Studies. Retrieved 14 April 2019.

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