Tammaritu II

Tammaritu II was the ruler of Elam from 652 until 650 or 649 BC.[1][2] After the brief reigns of Indabibi and Humban-haltash III, Tammaritu II was briefly restored to power in 648.[1] Tammaritu II was the son of Tammaritu I and the successor of Ummanigash,[1] his uncle.[3]

After a failed attack in 652 BC by then Elamite king Ummanigash against the Assyrian Empire, Tammaritu II rose to power in a coup.[3] Tammaritu continued Ummanigash's policy of supporting the Babylonian ruler Shamash-shum-ukin against the Assyrian king Ashurbanipal.[4] During the fighting, one of his generals, Indabibi, switched sides, and Tammaritu escaped to Nineveh in either 650 or 649 BC.[4] Thus began the brief rule of Indabibi over Elam.

In 648 BC, Indabibi was killed and replaced by Humban-haltash III.[5] The Assyrians then invaded Elam again, and installed Tammaritu once more as king of Elam.[6] Tammaritu was then deposed and exiled by Assyria after complaining about the Assyrian plundering of Elam.[7] Humban-haltash III then ruled again over Elam.[8]

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ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c Jane McIntosh gives the date of the end of his first reign as 649. Jane McIntosh (2005). Ancient Mesopotamia: New Perspectives. ABC-CLIO. p. 359. ISBN 978-1-57607-965-2.
  2. ^ Potts gives the date of the end of Tammaritu's first reign as either 650 or 649 BC. D. T. Potts (1999). The Archaeology of Elam: Formation and Transformation of an Ancient Iranian State. p. 282.
  3. ^ a b D. T. Potts (1999). The Archaeology of Elam: Formation and Transformation of an Ancient Iranian State. p. 281.
  4. ^ a b D. T. Potts (1999). The Archaeology of Elam: Formation and Transformation of an Ancient Iranian State. p. 282.
  5. ^ Elizabeth Carter and Matthew W. Stolper (1984). Elam: Surveys of Political History and Archaeology. p. 50.
  6. ^ Elizabeth Carter and Matthew W. Stolper (1984). Elam: Surveys of Political History and Archaeology. p. 51.
  7. ^ D. T. Potts (29 July 1999). The Archaeology of Elam: Formation and Transformation of an Ancient Iranian State. Cambridge University Press. p. 283. ISBN 978-0-521-56496-0.
  8. ^ John Boederman (1997). The Cambridge Ancient History. Cambridge University Press. p. 153. ISBN 978-0-521-22717-9.