Talk:Brinell scale

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[I made an incorrect comment and then removed it - sorry. Chris]

Image of Brinell-tested tensile specimenEdit

Would this be of use in illustrating the concept?--128.115.27.10 20:18, 5 April 2007 (UTC)

HBS compared with HBWEdit

What hardness is HBS good up to ? How does that relate to the hardness of the ball used ? Do HBS and HBW match for softer materials ? up to what HBW ? Rod57 (talk) 13:06, 17 April 2010 (UTC)

Could article say what variation in hardness might be calculated using different forces and indenter diameters ? Rod57 (talk) 13:06, 17 April 2010 (UTC)

What is BHN?Edit

Somebody missed to add all the explanations for the formula.
Please add them.
--Jangirke (talk) 01:38, 20 December 2011 (UTC)

Dimensionless?Edit

Why is this article classified in the category of Dimensionless numbers? Is not Brinell hardness a quantity that has the dimension of pressure? Doesn't it follow from the definitions in this article that the unit of BHN, as defined here, is kgf/mm² (in gravitational metric system), and that the unit of HBW is N/mm², which is the same as one megapascal (in SI units)? Both are units of pressure. -FKLS Maybe it is customary to omit its units, but these are what the numbers really mean. (talk) 07:08, 7 March 2014 (UTC)

This wikipedia article plagiarizes the page at http://www.engineersedge.com/manufacturing/brinell_hardness_test_equation_13173.htmEdit

I will be notifying their administrators that someone here has infringed their rights.

This is unacceptable, and it is copied word for word.75.159.163.218 (talk) 18:10, 26 May 2015 (UTC)

The standards referencedEdit

The standards referenced need to be updated, as new the ones referenced were withdrawn and replaced by a newer version on 2014. Additionally, the pages linked to the standards are wrong. I tried following the standard EN ISO 6506-1:2005: Metallic materials – Brinell hardness test – Part 1: test method and it was linked to a Vickers (NOT Brinell) standard (also withdrawn) — Preceding unsigned comment added by 79.136.68.68 (talk) 10:56, 24 January 2019 (UTC)

Non-Destructive - ClarificationEdit

I made an account because I saw something I could help clarify. The advantages section has a confusing tag at the top.

Brinell Testing is seen as non-destructive since it minimally damages the part in question, and it does not impair the function, compared to endurance testing, which usually breaks the part entirely.

Ethanjpoland (talk) 13:48, 16 October 2020 (UTC) Ethanjpoland

Return to "Brinell scale" page.