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Take Command Console

Take Command Console (TCC), formerly known as 4DOS for Windows NT (4NT), is a command line interpreter by JP Software, designed as a substitute for the default command interpreter in Microsoft Windows, CMD.EXE.[2][discuss][3]

Take Command Console
Developer(s) JP Software
Stable release 23.0 Build 29[1] (September 5, 2018; 43 days ago (2018-09-05)) [±]
Operating system Server 2003, Server 2008, Vista, 7, 8, 10[1]
Platform Microsoft Windows (Intel x86 32-bit/64-bit)[1]
Type Command shell
License Proprietary commercial
Website jpsoft.com

Contents

HistoryEdit

TCC is based on the earlier 4DOS command shell for DOS, and 4OS2 for OS/2.[4]

The NDOS interpreter and batch file extensions included with several Norton Utilities implementations prior to 2000 is a lightly modified and extended 4DOS interpreter.

Beginning with version 12 of 4NT, support for Windows 95, 98, ME, NT and 2000 were removed. Beginning with version 16 of TCC, support for Windows XP was removed,[1] although it might still run in XP. 4NT was renamed to Take Command Console as part of JP Software's Take Command version 9.

FeaturesEdit

TCC provides a rich set of command line and batch programming capabilities. It can work in conjunction with other scripting languages, such as REXX, Ruby and Perl, or Windows Scripting languages, in the form of Active Scripting engines such as VBScript and JScript as well as PerlScript (via ActivePerl), TclScript (via ActiveTcl), PythonScript (via ActivePython), and the scripting engine version of Object REXX to provide greater access to the operating system.

TCC features a number of enhancements when compared to CMD.EXE[5]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d Take Command and TCC/LE Downloads
  2. ^ "Take Command is a powerful Windows GUI command interpreter", todaysoftware.net
  3. ^ "Review: Take Command 14 command line utility is easier to use than PowerShell" by Erez Zukerman, PC World, 30 November 2012
  4. ^ Nathan A. Culp (2 February 2014). "Take Command Is the Best Kept Secret in the Computer Programming Industry!". Beaufort, South Carolina: The Computer Repair Man.
  5. ^ Product Comparison:
  6. ^ "Take Command review" by Ian Harac, PC Advisor, 23 September 2009

External linksEdit