Surma (woreda)

Suri is one of the woredas in the Southern Nations, Nationalities, and Peoples' Region of Ethiopia. It is named for the Surma or Suri people, whose homeland lies largely in this woreda. Part of the West OmoZone, Suri woreda is bordered on the south and west by South Sudan, on the northwest by the Gambela Region, on the north by Bero, and on the east by Maji. A portion of the Omo National Park extends into the southern part of this woreda.

OverviewEdit

The average elevation in this woreda is 2088 meters above sea level.[1] Rivers include the Kaia River, a tributary of the Akobo, which has its origins in this woreda. High points include Mount Naita (2560 meters) on the Ethiopian-South Sudanese border. According to a 2004 report, Surma woreda had 26 kilometers of dry-weather roads, for an average road density of 5 kilometers per 1000 square kilometers.[2] This lack of roads means remote locations are accessible only by air. Only recently radio communication lines wre made available in this woreda.[3] As of 2008, about 30% of the total population of Surma has access to drinking water.[4]

DemographicsEdit

The three largest ethnic groups reported in 1994 in the Surma woreda were the Surma/Suri people (93.79%), the Dizi (3.09%), and the Amhara, i.e., northerners (1.71%); others made up 1.41% of the population. The Suri was spoken as a first language by 94.02% of the inhabitants; 2.9% spoke Dizin, and 2.01% spoke Amharic; the remaining 1.07% spoke other primary languages reported.[5] Concerning education, 43.65% of the population were considered literate; 33.59% of children aged 7-12 were in primary school; 15.31% of the children aged 13-14 were in junior secondary school, and 12.5% of the inhabitants aged 15-18 were in senior secondary school.[6] Concerning sanitary conditions, about 70% of the urban and 16% of the total had toilet facilities.[7] Based on the (most recent) 2007 Population Census conducted by the CSA, the woreda had a total population of 24,598, of whom 11,794 were men and 12,804 women; 914 or 3.72% of its population were 'urban dwellers' (i.e., living in the small towns in the area. The majority of the inhabitants practice traditional beliefs, with 96.25% of the population reporting that belief, 1.63% practiced Ethiopian Orthodox Christianity, and 1.59% were Protestants.[8]. In recent years the number of converts to Protestant-Evangelical faiths has increased.


NotesEdit

  1. ^ Hailu Ejara Kene, Baseline Survey of 55 Weredas of PCDP Phase II, Part I Archived 2011-07-20 at the Wayback Machine (Addis Ababa: August 2008), Annex 1 (accessed 23 March 2009)
  2. ^ "Detailed statistics on roads" Archived 2011-07-20 at the Wayback Machine, SNNPR Bureau of Finance and Economic Development website (accessed 15 September 2009)
  3. ^ Joachim Ahrens, "Kefa - the Cradel of Coffee" UNDP-EUE Report, January 1997 (accessed 19 February 2009)
  4. ^ Hailu Ejara Kene, Baseline Survey, Annexes 16, 17 (accessed 9 October 2009)
  5. ^ 1994 Population and Housing Census of Ethiopia: Results for Southern Nations, Nationalities, and Peoples' Region, Vol. 1, part 1, Tables 2.1, 2.2, 2.12, 2.15. (accessed 30 December 2008)
  6. ^ 1994 Population and Housing Census of Ethiopia: Results for Southern Nations, Nationalities, and Peoples' Region, Vol. 1, part 2, Tables 3.5, 3.7 (accessed 17 April 2009)
  7. ^ 1994 Population and Housing Census of Ethiopia: Results for Southern Nations, Nationalities, and Peoples' Region, Vol. 1, part 2, Tables 6.3, 6.13 (accessed 17 April 2009)
  8. ^ Census 2007 Tables: Southern Nations, Nationalities, and Peoples' Region, Tables 2.1, and 3.4.

Coordinates: 6°00′N 35°15′E / 6.000°N 35.250°E / 6.000; 35.250