Stearalkonium chloride

Stearalkonium chloride is a type of benzalkonium chloride which is used as an anti-static agent, a surfactant and an antimicrobial.[1] It is an ingredient in some cosmetics and hair care products, particularly conditioners.[2] It was originally designed by the fabric industry for use as a fabric softener.

Stearalkonium chloride[1]
Stearalkonium chloride.png
Names
IUPAC name
benzyldimethyloctadecylazanium chloride
Other names
Dimethylbenzyloctadecylammonium chloride; Benzyldimethyloctadecylammonium chloride; Benzyldimethylstearylammonium chloride; Benzylstearyldimethylammonium chloride; N,N-dimethyl-n-octadecylbenzenemethanaminium chloride
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.004.117 Edit this at Wikidata
EC Number
  • 204-527-9
UNII
  • InChI=1S/C27H50N.ClH/c1-4-5-6-7-8-9-10-11-12-13-14-15-16-17-18-22-25-28(2,3)26-27-23-20-19-21-24-27;/h19-21,23-24H,4-18,22,25-26H2,1-3H3;1H/q+1;/p-1 ☒N
    Key: SFVFIFLLYFPGHH-UHFFFAOYSA-M ☒N
  • InChI=1/C27H50N.ClH/c1-4-5-6-7-8-9-10-11-12-13-14-15-16-17-18-22-25-28(2,3)26-27-23-20-19-21-24-27;/h19-21,23-24H,4-18,22,25-26H2,1-3H3;1H/q+1;/p-1
    Key: SFVFIFLLYFPGHH-REWHXWOFAD
  • CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC[N+](C)(C)CC1=CC=CC=C1.[Cl-]
Properties
C27H50ClN
Molar mass 424.15 g·mol−1
Hazards
Lethal dose or concentration (LD, LC):
1250 mg/kg (oral, rat)
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references

Toxicology studies have determined that stearalkonium chloride is safe and non-toxic at the concentrations typically used in cosmetic products (0.1 to 5%).[3] At higher concentrations (25% solution), it has been shown to cause minor skin and eye irritation in animals.[3]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Stearyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride, chemicalland21.com
  2. ^ Stearalkonium chloride, Household Products Database
  3. ^ a b "Final Report on the Safety Assessment of Stearalkonium Chloride". International Journal of Toxicology. 1 (2): 57–69. 1982. doi:10.3109/10915818209013147. S2CID 208507695.