St Mary's Church, Pype Hayes

St Mary's Church is a Grade II listed parish church in the Church of England in Pype Hayes, Birmingham, England.[1]

St Mary's
St Marys Church, St Marys Close, Pype Hayes (geograph 3734941).jpg
52°31′18.69″N 1°48′38.59″W / 52.5218583°N 1.8107194°W / 52.5218583; -1.8107194Coordinates: 52°31′18.69″N 1°48′38.59″W / 52.5218583°N 1.8107194°W / 52.5218583; -1.8107194
LocationPype Hayes, Birmingham
CountryEngland
DenominationChurch of England
Websitewww.stmarysb24.org
History
DedicationSt Mary the Virgin
Architecture
Heritage designationGrade II listed
Architect(s)Edwin Francis Reynolds
StyleArts and Crafts
Groundbreaking1929
Completed1930 (1930)
Construction cost£20,415
Administration
ParishSt Mary, Pype Hayes
DeaneryAston
ArchdeaconryAston
DioceseAnglican Diocese of Birmingham
ProvinceProvince of Canterbury

HistoryEdit

The church was designed by the architect Edwin Francis Reynolds in 1927[2] and constructed between 1929 and 1930. The builders were C. Bryant and Son and the cost was £20,415. The funding for the construction came from the sale of the site of St Mary's Church, Whittall Street, Birmingham.

The red-brick church and its hall were jointly given listed status in October 1995.[3]

The congregation of St Mary's Pype Hayes are mission partners with CPAS, Malawi, Mercy Air, St Basil's and TearFund.[4]

OrganEdit

The church contains an organ dating from 1900 by Nicholson and Lord. A specification of the organ can be found on the National Pipe Organ Register.[5]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ The Buildings of England. Warwickshire. Nikolaus Pevsner. Penguin Books. ISBN 0140710310 p.176
  2. ^ Pevsner Architectural Guides. Birmingham. Andy Foster. Yale University Press. ISBN 978-0300107319. p.293
  3. ^ Historic England. "Details from listed building database (1235495)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 20 February 2015.
  4. ^ Church, Django. "Mission Partners - St Mary's, Pype Hayes". www.stmarysb24.org. Retrieved 2018-06-28.
  5. ^ "NPOR D02623". National Pipe Organ Register. British Institute of Organ Studies. Retrieved 19 February 2015.