Squallor

Squallor (also spelled as Gli Squallor) were an Italian comedy music group, active between 1973 and 1994.

CareerEdit

The group formed in 1973 as a ribald side project of four established musicians: composer and producer Giancarlo Bigazzi, producer Alfredo Cerruti, lyricist Daniele Pace and songwriter Totò Savio.[1] Characterized by adult themes, references to sex, political incorrectness, and vulgarity, in spite of no live activity and radio ostracism, they got an immediate commercial success.[1] In 1984 they wrote and starred in the low budget comedy Arrapaho, loosely inspired by their album with the same name, which was a surprise hit at the box office and achieved some cult status.[2] The group disbanded in 1994, following their last album Cambiamento.[1] 2012 saw the release of Gli Squallor, a documentary about the group.[3]

The Squallor reached the crest of their popularity at the end of the 1980s. Federation of the Greens, Gianni De Michelis (in the song Demiculis) and Umberto Bossi (in Berta II) were some of their political and satyrical targets.[4]

DiscographyEdit

Albums
  • 1973 – Troia
  • 1974 – Palle
  • 1977 – Vacca
  • 1977 – Pompa
  • 1978 – Cappelle
  • 1980 – Tromba
  • 1981 – Mutando
  • 1982 – Scoraggiando
  • 1983 – Arrapaho
  • 1984 – Uccelli d'Italia
  • 1985 – Tocca l'albicocca
  • 1986 – Manzo
  • 1988 – Cielo duro
  • 1994 – Cambiamento

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c Enrico Deregibus (8 October 2010). Dizionario completo della Canzone Italiana. Giunti Editore, 2010. ISBN 978-8809756250.
  2. ^ Marco Giusti (1999). Dizionario dei film italiani stracult. Sperling & Kupfer,1999. ISBN 8820029197.
  3. ^ Francesco Prisco (26 September 2012). "Chiedi chi erano gli Squallor. In un documentario rivivono i padri del rock demenziale". Il Sole 24 Ore. Retrieved 16 August 2015.
  4. ^ Applauso, Nicolino (December 1, 2014). "The Squallor phenomenon: Social and political satire in Italian music during the First Republic". Incontri: Rivista Europea di Studi Italiani. Utrecht University Library Open Access Journals (Publishing Services). 29 (2): 30–42. doi:10.18352/incontri.9876. ISSN 0169-3379. OCLC 7180214511. Archived from the original on July 21, 2018. Retrieved June 19, 2021 – via paperity.org.

External linksEdit