Spirit of St. Louis (train)

The Spirit of St. Louis was a named passenger train on the Pennsylvania Railroad and its successors Penn Central and Amtrak between New York and St. Louis, Missouri. The Pennsylvania introduced the Spirit of St. Louis on June 15, 1927, replacing the New Yorker (eastbound) and St. Louisian (westbound); that September its schedule was 24 hr 50 min each way.

Spirit of St. Louis
Spirit of St. Louis at Terre Haute (27103339634).jpg
The Spirit of St. Louis at Terre Haute, Indiana in 1970
Overview
Service typeInter-city rail
StatusDiscontinued
LocaleEastern United States
PredecessorNew Yorker (Eastbound)
St. Loiusian (Westbound)
First serviceJune 15, 1927
Last serviceJuly 1971
SuccessorNational Limited
Former operator(s)Pennsylvania Railroad (1927–1968)
Penn Central (1968-1971)
Amtrak (1971)
Route
StartNew York City
EndSt. Louis, Missouri
Distance travelled1,050.6 miles (1,690.8 km)
Service frequencyDaily
Train number(s)30 (St. Louis to New York)
31 (New York to St. Louis)
Line(s) usedMain Line (Pennsylvania Railroad)
On-board services
Seating arrangementsReclining seat coaches
Sleeping arrangementsRoomettes, double bedrooms (1964)
Catering facilitiesDining car
Observation facilitiesLounge car
Technical
Timetable number(s)30 (eastbound); 31 (westbound)
Route map
St. Louis
Missouri
Illinois
East St. Louis
Effingham
Illinois
Indiana
Terre Haute
Indianapolis
Richmond
Indiana
Ohio
Dayton
Columbus
Newark
Ohio
Pennsylvania
Pittsburgh
Altoona
Harrisburg
Lancaster
Paoli
North Philadelphia
Pennsylvania
New Jersey
Newark
New Jersey
New York
New York

The name honored the airplane Spirit of St. Louis, flown the month before by Charles Lindbergh from New York to Paris. The Spirit of St. Louis remained in service through the inception of Amtrak, who extended it to Kansas City, Missouri along the Missouri Pacific Railroad main line. The train had a competitor in the New York Central Railroad's Southwestern Limited, also running from New York to St. Louis.

Amtrak also added a branch from Harrisburg, Pennsylvania to Washington, D.C., via York, Pennsylvania and Baltimore, Maryland. In July 1971, to better reflect its new scope, the train was rebranded as the National Limited[1]:118–the name of a longstanding train that had been operated by the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad and had been the principal rival of the Spirit of St. Louis.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Sanders, Craig (2003). Limiteds, Locals, and Expresses in Indiana, 1838–1971. Bloomington, Indiana: Indiana University Press. ISBN 978-0-253-34216-4.

Further readingEdit

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