Sorrell and Son (TV series)

Sorrell and Son is a British television miniseries which aired on ITV in six hour-long episodes from 6 to 11 July 1984. The story is taken from the 1925 novel of the same name by Warwick Deeping.[1] The story was previously filmed as a silent film in 1927 and again in 1934.[2][3]

Sorrell and Son
GenreDrama
Written byWarwick Deeping (novel)
Jeremy Paul
Directed byDerek Bennett
Composer(s)Patrick Gowers
Country of originUnited Kingdom
Original language(s)English
No. of series1
No. of episodes6
Production
Executive producer(s)David Cunliffe
Producer(s)Derek Bennett
Running time60 minutes
Production company(s)Yorkshire Television
DistributorITV Studios
Release
Original networkITV
Picture format4:3
Audio formatMono
Original release6 June (1984-06-06) –
11 July 1984 (1984-07-11)

The television miniseries was produced by Yorkshire Television and it starred Richard Pasco and John Shrapnel

Plot summaryEdit

In post-World War I England, impoverished Captain Stephen Sorrell (Richard Pasco) must raise his son Kit (Paul Critchley) by himself, after his wife had walked out on him. Captain Sorrell's years of devotion and sacrifice for his son come to fruition years in the future.

CastEdit

ReceptionEdit

Writing for The Los Angeles Times, Terry Atkinson called the series "a tolerable drama about some very likable people", but with the caveat; "These people are too likable--unrealistically caring, kind and resigned. Or, in rare cases when someone less than a saint shows up, he or she flaunts the transparently despicable characteristics of a Snidely Whiplash. Everyone's either a dear old soul or a scoundrel." He summarized it as "mildly engrossing fare."[4]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Roberts p.37
  2. ^ "Sorrell and Son (1934) - Overview - TCM.com". Turner Classic Movies. Retrieved 8 October 2014.
  3. ^ "Sorrell and Son (1934)". The New York Times. Retrieved 8 October 2014.
  4. ^ Atkinson, Terry (December 11, 1987). "'Sorrell and Son' Tastes Like Soggy Biscuits". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 20 September 2017.

BibliographyEdit

  • Jerry Roberts. Encyclopedia of Television Film Directors. Scarecrow Press, 2009.

External linksEdit