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Sonny Side Up is an album by trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie, and the tenor saxophonists Sonny Stitt and Sonny Rollins, recorded in December 1957 in New York City. It was released in 1959 on producer Norman Granz's newly launched Verve label.

Sonny Side Up
Sonny Side Up.jpg
Studio album by
ReleasedJanuary 1959[1]
RecordedDecember 19, 1957
Nola Recording Studio, New York City
GenreJazz, bebop, hard bop
Length37:42
LabelVerve
MGV-8262
ProducerNorman Granz
Dizzy Gillespie chronology
The Greatest Trumpet of Them All
(1957)
Sonny Side Up
(1959)
The Ebullient Mr. Gillespie
(1959)
Sonny Rollins chronology
A Night at the Village Vanguard
(1957)
Sonny Side Up
(1957)
Freedom Suite
(1958)
Sonny Stitt chronology
Sonny Stitt with the New Yorkers
(1957)
Sonny Side Up
(1957)
The Saxophones of Sonny Stitt
(1958)

As Thomas Cunniffe has written, "The pairing of Rollins and Stitt was highly inspired. More important than their common nicknames (and the punning album title), tenor saxophonists Rollins and Stitt were both influenced by Charlie Parker, but each took a vastly different approach to improvisation. Stitt transferred Parker’s white-hot intensity to the tenor after several fans and critics pointed out the tonal similarity of their alto sounds. Rollins was a more thoughtful player who expanded the vocabulary of bop improvisation by incorporating thematic elements into his solos and by experimenting with different melodic shapes and unusual phrase lengths."[2]

Pianist Ray Bryant, bassist Tommy Bryant, and drummer Charlie Persip provide the rhythm section.[3]

Contents

Track listingEdit

  1. "On the Sunny Side of the Street" (Jimmy McHugh, Dorothy Fields) - 5:41
  2. "The Eternal Triangle" (Stitt) - 14:10
  3. "After Hours" (Avery Parrish) - 12:19
  4. "I Know That You Know" (Vincent Youmans) - 5:27

PersonnelEdit

Additional personnelEdit

  • Burt Goldblatt - cover photography
  • Nat Hentoff – liner notes

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Billboard, February 9, 1959.
  2. ^ "Dizzy Gillespie:'Sonny Side Up' (Verve 314 521 426)/'Duets' (Verve 835 253)", Retro Reviews - Jazz History Online.
  3. ^ Stephen Cook, Allmusic review