Solar eclipse of December 15, 1982

A partial solar eclipse occurred on December 15, 1982. A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes between Earth and the Sun, thereby totally or partly obscuring the image of the Sun for a viewer on Earth. A partial solar eclipse occurs in the polar regions of the Earth when the center of the Moon's shadow misses the Earth. Occurring only 2.7 days before apogee (Apogee on December 18, 1982), the Moon's apparent diameter was smaller.

Solar eclipse of December 15, 1982
SE1982Dec15P.png
Map
Type of eclipse
NaturePartial
Gamma1.1293
Magnitude0.735
Maximum eclipse
Coordinates65°18′N 56°54′E / 65.3°N 56.9°E / 65.3; 56.9
Times (UTC)
Greatest eclipse9:32:09
References
Saros122 (56 of 70)
Catalog # (SE5000)9471

Related eclipsesEdit

Eclipses in 1982Edit

Solar eclipses of 1982–1985Edit

This eclipse is a member of a semester series. An eclipse in a semester series of solar eclipses repeats approximately every 177 days and 4 hours (a semester) at alternating nodes of the Moon's orbit.[1]

Note: Partial solar eclipses on January 25, 1982 and July 20, 1982 occur in the previous lunar year eclipse set.

Solar eclipse series sets from 1982–1985
Ascending node   Descending node
Saros Map Gamma Saros Map Gamma
117  
1982 June 21
Partial
-1.21017 122  
1982 December 15
Partial
1.12928
127  
1983 June 11
Total
-0.49475 132  
1983 December 4
Annular
0.40150
137  
1984 May 30
Annular
0.27552 142
 
Partial from Gisborne, NZ
 
1984 November 22
Total
-0.31318
147  
1985 May 19
Partial
1.07197 152  
1985 November 12
Total
-0.97948

Metonic cycleEdit

The metonic series repeats eclipses every 19 years (6939.69 days), lasting about 5 cycles. Eclipses occur in nearly the same calendar date. In addition, the octon subseries repeats 1/5 of that or every 3.8 years (1387.94 days). All eclipses in this table occur at the Moon's descending node.

21 events between July 22, 1971 and July 22, 2047
July 21–22 May 9–11 February 26–27 December 14–15 October 2–3
116 118 120 122 124
 
July 22, 1971
 
May 11, 1975
 
February 26, 1979
 
December 15, 1982
 
October 3, 1986
126 128 130 132 134
 
July 22, 1990
 
May 10, 1994
 
February 26, 1998
 
December 14, 2001
 
October 3, 2005
136 138 140 142 144
 
July 22, 2009
 
May 10, 2013
 
February 26, 2017
 
December 14, 2020
 
October 2, 2024
146 148 150 152 154
 
July 22, 2028
 
May 9, 2032
 
February 27, 2036
 
December 15, 2039
 
October 3, 2043
156
 
July 22, 2047

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ van Gent, R.H. "Solar- and Lunar-Eclipse Predictions from Antiquity to the Present". A Catalogue of Eclipse Cycles. Utrecht University. Retrieved 6 October 2018.

External linksEdit