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SkeptiCamps are smallish grassroots conferences where scientific skeptics come together and participate and present.[1] Some are operated in the style of an unconference.[2]

SkepticampBanner1.jpg
SkeptiCamp Open Events
Founded 2007
Type Nonprofit
Focus science education, skepticism
Key people
Daniel Loxton,
Reed Esau

Contents

HistoryEdit

BackgroundEdit

 
Reed Esau founder of SkeptiCamp. February 2011.

The SkeptiCamp concept was founded in 2007 by Reed Esau.[3][4] It was partially inspired by Daniel Loxton's 2007 essay on the state of the Skeptical movement, "Where Do We Go From Here?", and from attending The Amaz!ng Meeting in 2007, an annual conference that focuses on science, skepticism, and critical thinking.[5]

SkeptiCamps can be "loosely organized",[6][4] the format also allows ad hoc group formation, and avoids the overhead associated with more formal content channels.[7][4]

EventsEdit

The first SkeptiCamp was held in August 2007 in Denver, and was organized by Reed Esau[8] along with Rich Ludwig and Crystal Yates-White.[9][4] Since that first event, over one hundred other events[10] have been held in cities such as Winnipeg, Canada;[11][12] Colorado Springs;[13] Nashua, New Hampshire;[14] Chicago, Illinois;[2] and Seaside, California.[15]

In January 2018 Monterey County Skeptics ran their 4th Skepticamp at Seaside;[16][17] and in February 2018 Fort Collins held their 8th consecutive annual skepticamp.[18]

Outside the United StatesEdit

The first SkeptiCamp in Australia was run by the Australian Skeptics on April 30th 2011 at the University of Technology Sydney. 100 people attended the 7 hour event and discussed a broad range of topics from the conflict in the Middle East to genetically modified food and clinical trials in the United States.[19][20][21] Melbourne SkeptiCamp followed on October 22, 2011, at the University of Melbourne,[22][23] then shortly afterwards the Surf Coast Summer SkeptiCamp was launched on January 21, 2012, at the Aireys Inlet Community Hall.[23] The science on top podcast was recorded live at the 2018 Surf Coast Summer Skepticamp.[24] Skepticamps are held annually in Australia at the Surf Coast,[25] Canberra,[26] and Brisbane.[27]

On October 23, 2010, four simultaneous SkeptiCamps were held in Canada, in Vancouver, Winnipeg, Ottawa and Toronto.[28]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Loxton, Daniel (November–December 2009). "The Paradoxical Future of Skepticism" (journal). The Skeptical Inquirer. 33 (6): 24–27. Retrieved March 22, 2012.
  2. ^ a b Hill, Kyle (December 19, 2013). "When You Decide To Dispel The Santa Claus Myth, Make It A Teachable Moment". Scientific American. Retrieved May 8, 2017.
  3. ^ Stollznow, Karen (2010-12-24). "Reed Esau - SkeptiCamp: The Unconference". Point Of Inquiry. Retrieved 2015-01-04.
  4. ^ a b c d Gerbic, Susan (2015). "Adventures in SkeptiCamp". Archived from the original on 20 Jun 2017.
  5. ^ Farley, Tim; Esau, Reed (2008-11-18). "This One Time at SkeptiCamp…". Skepticality. Retrieved 2012-03-04.
  6. ^ Plait, Phil (March 24, 2008). "Skepticamp thoughts". Slate (magazine). Retrieved May 8, 2017.
  7. ^ Esau, Reed. "Raising Our Game - The Rationale to Embrace SkeptiCamp" (PDF). Skeptic Magazine website. Retrieved 2012-03-01.
  8. ^ Gerbic, Susan (3 Feb 2017). "Local Skeptical Outreach & Activism: Monterey County Skepticamp". Archived from the original on 18 Sep 2017.
  9. ^ Esau, Reed (November–December 2009). "Reinventing the Skeptic Conference". The Skeptical Inquirer (journal)|format= requires |url= (help). 33 (6): 28–29.
  10. ^ "SkeptiCamp". Lanyrd, the social conference directory. Retrieved May 8, 2017.
  11. ^ Vesely, Carolyn (November 30, 2010). "Says who? Members of the Winnipeg Skeptics rely on reason to separate the real meat from the baloney". Winnipeg Free Press. Retrieved May 8, 2017.
  12. ^ Story, Jared (September 13, 2013). "Disbelievers, unite for SkeptiCamp in Winnipeg". Toronto Metro. Retrieved May 16, 2017.
  13. ^ Fagin, Barry (August 17, 2011). "Skepticamp offers opportunity to experience critical thinking". The Gazette (Colorado Springs). Retrieved May 8, 2017.
  14. ^ Brooks, David (October 29, 2012). "Keep an open mind, but not so open that your brain falls out". Nashua Telegraph. Retrieved May 16, 2017.
  15. ^ Evers, Jeannie. "Skeptics Gather in Seaside for First Local SkeptiCamp". Monterey County Herald. Retrieved January 3, 2015.
  16. ^ Gerbic, Susan (20 March 2018). "MCS Skepticamp bringing skepticism to the people". Archived from the original on 22 March 2018.
  17. ^ Royal, David (7 January 2018). "SkeptiCamp: Voting, witness testimony among topics questioned". montereyherald.com. Archived from the original on 22 March 2018. Retrieved 22 March 2018.
  18. ^ Gerbic, Susan (11 April 2018). "Colorado Dreaming". Center for Inquiry. Archived from the original on 11 April 2018. Retrieved 12 April 2018.
  19. ^ "Skepticamp Sydney 2011". lanyrd.com. Retrieved 21 May 2017.
  20. ^ "First Skepticamp a Success". skeptics.com.au. Australian Skeptics. Retrieved 9 May 2017.
  21. ^ "The skeptic Zone #133 6 May 2011" (Podcast). Retrieved 9 May 2017.
  22. ^ "The Skeptic Zone #158 29 October 2011" (Podcast). Retrieved 9 May 2017.
  23. ^ a b "Skepticamp Australia". 16 May 2015. Archived from the original on 10 February 2018. Retrieved 9 May 2017.
  24. ^ Bijkersma, Michelle (June 2018). Tim Mendham, ed. "Surfing Skeptically". The Skeptic. Vol. 38 no. 2. Australia: Australian Skeptics. p. 14. ISSN 0726-9897. Retrieved 13 June 2018.
  25. ^ "SURFCOAST SUMMER SKEPTICAMP 2017". skeptics.com.au. Retrieved 21 May 2017.
  26. ^ "CANBERRA SKEPTICAMP". skeptics.com.au. Retrieved 21 May 2017.,
  27. ^ Saunders, Richard. "The Skepticzone #411 4 September 2016" (Podcast). Retrieved 21 May 2017.,
  28. ^ Gavura, Scott (October 5, 2010). "Skepticamp: Invading the Great White North on October 23". Science-Based Medicine. Retrieved May 8, 2017.

External linksEdit