Siege of Nisibis (573)

The Siege of Nisibis took place in 573 when the Eastern Roman (Byzantine) Empire, under Emperor Justin II, besieged the Sasanian city of Nisibis. The Sasanians successfully defended the city and defeated the Roman force.[3]

Siege of Nisibis
Part of the Byzantine–Sasanian War of 572–591
Date573
Location
Result Sasanian victory[1]
Belligerents
Eastern Roman (Byzantine) Empire Sasanian Empire
Commanders and leaders
Acacius
Marcian
Bahram Gushnasp[2]
Strength
Unknown Unknown

In line with "Justinianic model", the Romans mobilized garrisoned engineers for the attack, and ordered them to perform a "very complex siege".[4]

The reason behind the Roman rout at Nisibis was reportedly due to quarreling amongst the Roman officers.[1] According to the Syriac chronicles, however, the Sasanian forces were able to delay the Roman army, allowing them to prepare for extensive defense.[5] An account also cited a failure of intelligence from Arab clients so that the Romans were unaware of the Sasanian army's movement to the Euphrates junction with the Khabur.[6] This army attacked the Romans from the rear.

After the siege was lifted, the Sasanians used the Roman trebuchets that were left behind at the successful siege of Dara, later that year.[7] This particular siege lasted six months and the victory gave Khosrow I another important fortress in the eastern Mesopotamia in addition to Nisibis.[8]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Petersen 2013, p. 327. sfn error: multiple targets (2×): CITEREFPetersen2013 (help)
  2. ^ Jones, Arnold Hugh Martin; Martindale, John Robert; Morris, J. (1971). The prosopography of the later Roman Empire. University Press. p. 166.
  3. ^ Petersen 2013, pp. 277, 327. sfn error: multiple targets (2×): CITEREFPetersen2013 (help)
  4. ^ Petersen 2013, p. 121. sfn error: multiple targets (2×): CITEREFPetersen2013 (help)
  5. ^ Petersen, Leif Inge Ree (2013). Siege Warfare and Military Organization in the Successor States (400-800 AD): Byzantium, the West and Islam. Leiden: BRILL. p. 569. ISBN 9789004251991.
  6. ^ Curtis, Vesta Sarkhosh; Stewart, Sarah (2008). The Sasanian Era. London: I.B.Tauris. p. 123. ISBN 9781845116903.
  7. ^ Petersen 2013, pp. 277, 344. sfn error: multiple targets (2×): CITEREFPetersen2013 (help)
  8. ^ Bury, J. B. (2015). A History of the Later Roman Empire. Cambridge, MA: Cambridge University Press. p. 100. ISBN 9781108083188.

SourcesEdit

  • Greatrex, Geoffrey; Lieu, Samuel N.C., eds. (2002). The Roman Eastern Frontier and the Persian Wars: Part II, AD 363-630. Routledge. pp. 1–408. ISBN 978-0415465304.
  • Petersen, Leif Inge Ree (2013). Siege Warfare and Military Organization in the Successor States (400-800 AD): Byzantium, the West and Islam. BRILL. ISBN 978-9004254466.