Siege of Mosul (1743)

The Siege of Mosul (1743) was the siege of the Ottoman-held city of Mosul in northern Mesopotamia by Nader Shah's army during the Persian invasion of the Ottoman Empire in 1743.

Siege of Mosul
Part of the Ottoman–Persian War (1743–46) and Nader's Campaigns
Date13 September – 20 October 1743
Location
Result

Siege suspended

  • Negotiated Persian withdrawal[1][2]
Belligerents
Afsharid Imperial Standard (3 Stripes).svg Persian Empire Ottoman Empire
Commanders and leaders
Nader Shah Ahmad Pasha[3]
Hussain Pasha al-Jalili[4]
Strength

40,000+[5]

40,000+[6]
Casualties and losses
5,000[1] Heavy[1] (including civilians)

Commencement of the siegeEdit

The Persian siege train had been much improved and augmented since Nader's earlier campaigns as a Safavid general and included hundreds of heavy cannon and mortars. However, due to Nader's illness and impatience with the progression of the siege works, a premature assault was ordered with 40,000 Persian soldiers mounting the city walls using ladders. The city was heavily defended by her Wali Hussain Pasha al-Jalili. The attack was beaten back with heavy casualties. Nader sent a delegation into the city and the garrison commander received them warmly, agreeing to forward their terms to Istanbul and offering gifts to be taken back to the Shah. Istanbul sent a part of plenipotentiaries to negotiate a peace treaty predicated on Nader withdrawing to the border.

ConclusionEdit

The Persian army lifted the siege of Mosul, although the siege of Basra in the south continued nonetheless. The peace treaty was negotiated and signed by both parties, however, the Ottoman Sultan would later renege on the terms of agreement, thereby sanctioning the resumption of hostilities which eventually led to the Battle of Kars (1745).[1]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f Axworthy, Michael, "The Sword of Persia; Nader Shah, from Tribal Warrior to Conquering Tyrant", I B Tauris, 2009.
  2. ^ Ghafouri, Ali(2008). History of Iran's wars: from the Medes to now, Etela'at Publishing
  3. ^ fathilashkar sher dahan. "Military History". miltaryhistory111.blogspot.co.uk. Archived from the original on 17 November 2015. Retrieved 15 November 2015.
  4. ^ Olson, Robert W. (1975). The Siege of Mosul and Ottoman-Persian Relations 1718-1743. Uralic and Altaic Series. 124. Indiana: Indiana University Publications.
  5. ^ http://www.teheran.ir/spip.php?article1970#gsc.tab=0
  6. ^ http://www.teheran.ir/spip.php?article1970#gsc.tab=0