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SETA Corporation (株式会社セタ Kabushiki-Gaisha Seta) (Full company name Super Entertainment and Total Amusement) was a Japanese computer gaming company, founded on October 1, 1985[1] and dissolved on February 9, 2009. Seta was headquartered in Kōtō, Tokyo.[2] The American branch of Seta was located in Las Vegas, Nevada.[3]

SETA Corporation
Public
Subsidiary
IndustryComputer and video game industry
FateDissolved
FoundedOctober 1, 1985
DefunctFebruary 9, 2009
HeadquartersKōtō, Tokyo, Japan
ParentAruze
Websiteweb.archive.org/web/20080508011436/http://www.seta.co.jp/index.htm

As a video game publisher, it made games for the Nintendo Entertainment System, the Super Nintendo Entertainment System, and various other systems.[4] It also created development tools for Nintendo's various consoles.[5] It made games in North America but mainly Japan (specialising in golf and puzzle titles). SETA also developed the arcade system, the Aleck 64 which was based on N64 architecture.[6] Also, SETA co-developed the SSV (Sammy, SETA, Visco) system.[7]

In 1999, Aruze became the parent company. Seta withdrew from the game business in 2004 after releasing Legend of Golfer on the Nintendo GameCube.

On December 2008, parent company Aruze announced that SETA decided to close shop after 23 years of existence:

Based on the deterioration of economic conditions within Japan as caused by the current international financial crisis, Seta came to the conclusion that the continuation of its business on its own would be difficult, and thereby resolved its dissolution and liquidation.[8]

SETA closed its doors in January 23, 2009. During a board meeting on February 9, 2009, the company transferred its assets and business to parent Aruze, and SETA Corporation was officially dissolved.[9] SETA Corporation was subsequently liquidated at the Tokyo District Court in May 25, 2009.

Contents

SubsidiariesEdit

Former subsidiariesEdit

  • UD Technology Inc (ユーディテック・ジャパン株式会社): In 2003-12-20, UD Technology Inc announced merging into SETA Corporation, effective on 2004-04-01.[10] The merged entity became SETA Corporation's Unified Communication business headquarter.[11]
  • IKUSABUNE Co.,Ltd. (株式会社企画デザイン工房戦船): Merged into SETA Corporation, and became SETA Corporation's Image Contents business headquarter on 2004-04-01.[12]

ProductsEdit

  • Development of peripheral equipment for pachinko machines
  • Development of integrated circuit for pachinko machines
  • Development of communication equipment (conducted by the Unified Communications Division)
  • Game software development

Published video gamesEdit

Nintendo Entertainment SystemEdit

Game BoyEdit

Super Nintendo Entertainment System/Super FamicomEdit

Nintendo 64Edit

Sony PlaystationEdit

Sega SaturnEdit

Nintendo GameCubeEdit

Xbox 360Edit

M65C02Edit

MacintoshEdit

3DOEdit

Aleck 64 (arcade)Edit

The Aleck64 is the Nintendo 64 design in arcade form, designed by Seta in cooperation with Nintendo, and sold from 1998 to 2003 only in Japan.[17] It essentially consists of a Nintendo 64 board retrofitted with the sound capabilities which were standard for arcade games of the time.[18] Nintendo and Seta began working on their agreement for the board in 1996, hoping to recreate the business model Namco and Sony Computer Entertainment displayed with the Namco System 11, i.e. to facilitate conversions of arcade games by basing an arcade board on the console hardware.[19]

Games developedEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Caoili, Eric; Andersen, John (2009-01-21). "Veteran Japanese Studio Seta Closes Doors". Gamasutra. Retrieved 2009-01-23.
  2. ^ "Corporation Data." Seta Corporation. February 6, 2007. Retrieved on April 24, 2009.
  3. ^ "[1]." Seta USA. Retrieved on November 11, 2011.
  4. ^ https://www.gamespot.com/companies/seta-corporation/
  5. ^ "Nintendo Arcade System Nearly Complete". Next Generation. No. 33. Imagine Media. September 1997. p. 34.
  6. ^ http://ca.ign.com/articles/1997/07/01/seta-arcade-board-completed
  7. ^ http://neogeospirit.pagesperso-orange.fr/dossiers/visco/dossier_visco3.htm
  8. ^ Caoili, Erick, John Andersen, Staff. "Veteran Japanese Studio Seta Closes Doors." Gamasutra. January 21, 2009. Retrieved on October 5, 2009.
  9. ^ https://web.archive.org/web/20090606063407/http://www.tdb.co.jp/tosan/syosai/3046.html
  10. ^ ユーディテック・ジャパン株式会社 合併のお知らせ
  11. ^ 当社との合併に伴う、ユーディテック・ジャパン株式会社、株式会社 企画デザイン工房 戦船、の事業等に関するお知らせ
  12. ^ 合併に伴うお知らせ - 新体制発足のお知らせ
  13. ^ "Bio Force Ape". Nintendo Power. August 1991.
  14. ^ Nintendo Power. April 1992. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  15. ^ "A website about unreleased video games". Lost Levels. 2010-04-02. Retrieved 2014-06-16.
  16. ^ https://www.wwe.com/article/unreleased-wcw-nintendo-game-revealed
  17. ^ "Seta Aleck64 Hardware". System 16. Retrieved November 25, 2015.
  18. ^ "Tidbits...". Electronic Gaming Monthly. No. 98. Ziff Davis. September 1997. p. 23.
  19. ^ Svensson, Christian (September 1996). "Nintendo Opens Doors to Deals". Next Generation. No. 21. Imagine Media. p. 24.

External linksEdit