Schola Cantorum de Paris

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The Schola Cantorum de Paris is a private conservatory in Paris. It was founded in 1894 by Charles Bordes, Alexandre Guilmant and Vincent d'Indy as a counterbalance to the Paris Conservatoire's emphasis on opera.

Schola Cantorum

HistoryEdit

La Schola was founded in 1894 and opened on 15 October 1896 as a rival to the Paris Conservatoire. Alexandre Guilmant, an organist at the Conservatoire, was the director of the Schola before d'Indy took over. D'Indy set the curriculum, which fostered the study of late Baroque and early Classical works, Gregorian chant, and Renaissance polyphony. According to the Oxford Companion to Music, "A solid grounding in technique was encouraged, rather than originality, and the only graduates who could stand comparison with the best Conservatoire students were Magnard, Roussel, Déodat de Séverac, and Pierre de Bréville."[1] The school was originally located in Montparnasse; in 1900 it moved to its present site, a former convent in the Quartier Latin.[2]

Notable teachersEdit

AlumniEdit

In addition to those mentioned above, students, not all full-time, have included:

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Latham, Alison (ed) "Schola Cantorum", The Oxford Companion to Music, Oxford Music Online, Oxford University Press, retrieved 28 October 2014 (subscription required)
  2. ^ a b c "History", La Schola Cantorum, retrieved 28 October 2014
  3. ^ Barulich, Frances. "Albéniz, Isaac", Grove Music Online, Oxford University Press, retrieved 28 October 2014 (subscription required)
  4. ^ Bowen, José A. "Barzin, Leon", Grove Music Online, Oxford University Press, retrieved 28 October 2014 (subscription required)
  5. ^ "Antoine Geoffroy-Dechaume". The Telegraph. 19 May 2000. Archived from the original on 28 January 2015.
  6. ^ Salter, Lionel. "Landowska, Wanda", Grove Music Online, Oxford University Press, retrieved 28 October 2014 (subscription required)
  7. ^ Griffiths, Paul. . "Messiaen, Olivier", Grove Music Online, Oxford University Press, retrieved 28 October 2014 (subscription required)
  8. ^ Labelle, Nicole. "Roussel, Albert", Grove Music Online, Oxford University Press, retrieved 28 October 2014 (subscription required)
  9. ^ Langham Smith, Richard. "Canteloube, Joseph", Grove Music Online, Oxford University Press, retrieved 28 October 2014 (subscription required)
  10. ^ Walker-Hill, Helen (2007) From Spirituals to Symphonies: African-American Women Composers and Their Music. Champaign: University of Illinois Press ISBN 9780252074547
  11. ^ Shaftel, Matthew. "From Inspiration to Archive: Cole Porter's 'Night and Day'", Journal of Music Theory, Vol. 43, No. 2 (Autumn, 1999), p. 318 (subscription required)
  12. ^ Pen, Ronald (2010). Wonder as I Wander: The Life of John Jacob Niles. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky. Retrieved 28 March 2018
  13. ^ "Dulce María Serret", EcuRed (in Spanish), retrieved 29 November 2017
  14. ^ Orledge, Robert. "Satie, Erik", Grove Music Online, Oxford University Press, retrieved 28 October 2014 (subscription required)
  15. ^ Gómez Amat, Carlos. "Turina, Joaquín", Grove Music Online, Oxford University Press, retrieved 28 October 2014 (subscription required)
  16. ^ Griffiths, Paul. "Varèse, Edgard", Grove Music Online, Oxford University Press, retrieved 28 October 2014 (subscription required)
  17. ^ Griffiths, Paul. [1], Grove Music Online, Oxford University Press, retrieved 20 June 2020 (subscription required)
  18. ^ Encyclopaedia Universalis
  19. ^ Cohen, Aaron I. (1987). International encyclopedia of women composers (Second edition, revised and enlarged ed.). New York. ISBN 0-9617485-2-4. OCLC 16714846.

External linksEdit

Coordinates: 48°50′30″N 02°20′29″E / 48.84167°N 2.34139°E / 48.84167; 2.34139