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Saul Levitt (March 13, 1911 – 1977) was an American playwright and author, best known for his successful play The Andersonville Trial, based on MacKinlay Kantor's Pulitzer-Prize-winning novel Andersonville. Levitt's play was later made into an Emmy award-winning movie.[1]

Levitt was born in New York City[1] and died of heart failure on September 30, 1977.[2][1]

Levitt served with the United States Army Air Corps in World War II as a B-17 bomber crewman with the 100th Bomb Group,[3] flying missions against the Third Reich out of Thorpe Abbotts, UK. Early in his tour, he was severely injured in a traffic accident and was transferred to the reporting staff of Yank magazine,[2] where he wrote and published a number of articles about his group's experiences flying and fighting in the war.

WorksEdit

  • The Sun is Silent (1951)[4][3]
  • The Andersonville Trial (1960)[5][6]
  • The True Glory (1945)[7][8]
  • A Covenant with Death (1967)[7]
  • The Trial of the Catonsville Nine (1972)[7][9]

AwardsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c Kleiman, Dena (1 September 1977). "Saul Levitt, Playwright, Dies; Wrote 'The Andersonville Trial'". The New York Times. Retrieved December 5, 2017.
  2. ^ a b "100th Bomb Group (Heavy) Foundation". Home. 10 October 1943. Retrieved December 5, 2017.
  3. ^ a b Wald, A.M. (2011). Trinity of Passion: The Literary Left and the Antifascist Crusade. University of North Carolina Press. p. 197. ISBN 978-0-8078-8236-8. Retrieved December 5, 2017.
  4. ^ Levitt, S. (1951). The Sun is Silent. Harper. Retrieved December 5, 2017.
  5. ^ Holsinger, M.P. (1999). War and American Popular Culture: A Historical Encyclopedia. Occupational Safety and Health Guide. Greenwood Press. p. 81. ISBN 978-0-313-29908-7. Retrieved December 5, 2017.
  6. ^ Kabatchnik, A. (2011). Blood on the Stage, 1950-1975: Milestone Plays of Crime, Mystery, and Detection. Scarecrow Press. p. 335. ISBN 978-0-8108-7784-9. Retrieved December 5, 2017.
  7. ^ a b c "Saul Levitt". Samuel French – Plays. 20 November 2017. Retrieved December 5, 2017.
  8. ^ "The Andersonville Trial". The Peabody Awards. Retrieved December 5, 2017.
  9. ^ "Saul Levitt". Playbill. June 2, 1971. Retrieved December 5, 2017.
  10. ^ "The Andersonville Trial on DVD/Blu-ray 2012". Broadway on Video Database (BroadwayWorld.com). Retrieved December 5, 2017.
  11. ^ Brooks, T.; Marsh, E.F. (2009). The Complete Directory to Prime Time Network and Cable TV Shows, 1946-Present. Random House Publishing Group. p. 1640. ISBN 978-0-307-48320-1. Retrieved December 5, 2017.
  12. ^ Browne, R.B.; Browne, P. (2001). The Guide to United States Popular Culture. Bowling Green State University Popular Press. p. 38. ISBN 978-0-87972-821-2. Retrieved December 5, 2017.

External linksEdit