Saraye Ameriha

Saraye Ameriha is a large historic house in Kashan, Iran. It was originally built as a family residence during Zand dynasty for Agha Āmeri, the governor of Kashan, and it is now restored and transformed into a traditional-style museum and hotel.[1][2][3] Being the largest traditional house in Kashan, it has several interior and exterior yards, each consisting of pools and many rooms. It also has the highest wind catcher in Kashan.

Saraye Ameriha
هتل سرای عامری ها
Amerian House Taq.jpg
Saraye Ameriha at Kashan
General information
LocationKashan, Iran
Opening2014
Renovated2014
OwnerEzam Construction
Technical details
Size9000 Square meters
Awards and prizesTripAdvisor Travelers' Choice
Other information
Number of rooms27

The first attempt to restore a part of Kashan’s local culture began in 1999, and Ameriha House was entrusted to an experienced team for restoration, since it was ruined after earthquakes and lack of attention. Great care and attention was taken to restore the historical house based on its original blueprints and the first phase of the restoration project finally ended in 2014. The Phase two ended in 2017 and phase three is still going on, as new yards and areas are restored and made public for visits. The house’s opening ceremony was held in 2014 and Masoud Soltanifar, Vice President of Iran and head of Cultural Heritage, Handcrafts and Tourism Organization, professor Samii and other statesmen were in attendance for inaugurating ceremony.[4] Now, with twenty seven rooms, two restaurants, a coffee shop and an art gallery, SarayeAmeriha at Kashan is the pearl of desert.[5]

HistoryEdit

Ameri House was built 200 years ago, now it is a traditional museum and hotel which once had fallen into ruin for several years. Although now a functioning museum and boutique hotel, Ameri House is still being repaired and renovated in an attempt to set a new concept of Persian hospitality in historical hotels using a blend of traditional & fully decorated Rooms and facilities.[6] The Saraye Ameriha house is a large historic house in Kashan, Iran. It was originally built as a family residence during Zand dynasty for Agha Āmeri, the governor of Kashan, and it is now restored and transformed into a traditional-style hotel.[1][2][3]

StructureEdit

The Āmeri House is a huge House of 9,000 square metres (97,000 sq ft). It contains dozens of rooms, two bathhouses, and seven courtyards with gardens and fountains.[1][3] The main structure is made of brick. Mud and straw are used in the insulation. The inner spaces are decorated with gypsum and mirror works.[2] It has the highest wind catcher (Badgir) amongst houses in Kashan and like other traditional Iranian houses, it consists of interior and exterior sections, porches, pools, yards, crew yards , stables covered with various beautiful and artistic ornamentations of Iran such as stucco, Mogharnas, paintings on plaster, woodwork, woodcarving and some other ornamentation arts. It is closest to some monuments of Kashan like Tabatabai House and Borojerdi House that are the most beautiful samples of Persian Culture and architecture.[7][8]

Other Areas and ServicesEdit

Saraye Ameriha has several main yards, each with a large or small pool, surrounded by guest rooms and suites. Currently, it has 27 rooms, including presidentials and royals. Other facilities include a carpet weaving house, conference room for national and international cultural programmes and seminars, Sohrab Sepehri Gallery for showcasing art, Souvenir shop, coffee house, restaurant and many more saloons and halls.[1][3] The main structure is made of brick. Mud and straw are used in the insulation. The inner spaces are decorated with gypsum and mirror works.[2]

GalleryEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d "Kashan, a Lesson in Authenticity, Architecture". Financial Tribune. 8 February 2015.
  2. ^ a b c d "Ameri House: A Historical House in Iran's Kashan". Tasnim News Agency. 17 November 2017.
  3. ^ a b c d Erdbrink, Thomas (9 January 2013). "Restoring Iran's Heritage of Magnificent Homes in an Age of High Rises". The New York Times.
  4. ^ "Saraye Ameriha".
  5. ^ "Indipendent".
  6. ^ "TripAdvisor".
  7. ^ "Iran Traveling Centre".
  8. ^ "Wall Street Journal".

External linksEdit