Rotaract originally began as a Rotary International youth program in 1968[2] at Charlotte North Rotary Club in Charlotte, North Carolina, United States, and has grown into a major organization of over 10,904 clubs spread around the world and over 203,000 members in 189 countries.[3] It is a service, leadership, professional and community service organization (often miscommunicated as a Social Service Club) for young men and women aged 18 and over.[4]

Rotaract
Rotaract Logo 2015.svg
FormationMarch 13, 1968
FocusFellowship and Service
HeadquartersEvanston, Illinois
Location
  • Global
OriginsThe Rotary International Family
Area served
World Wide
Membership
203,298[1]
Websiterotary.org

Rotaract focuses on the development of young adults as leaders in their communities and workplaces. Clubs around the world also take part in international service projects, in a global effort to bring peace and international understanding to the world.

"Rotaract" stands for "Rotary in Action", although the name originally comes from a combination of "Rotary" and "Interact" (International + Action), the high school level program created by Rotary International in 1962.

Most Rotaract activities take place at the club level. Rotaract clubs hold formal meetings in person or virtually, usually every two weeks, which feature speakers, special outings, social activities, discussions or visits to other clubs. Club members get together on designated days for service project work, social events, or professional/leadership development workshops.

To be eligible for membership, prospective members must be 18 years of age and over, show that they are committed to Rotaract, and show that they are of good standing in the community. After being approved by the club, prospective members are 'inducted' to become members, also known as 'Rotaractors'.

The avenues of service include Club Service, Community Service, International Service and Professional Development.

Rotaract Club undertake various projects for the overall development of their members.

In 2019, Rotaract went from being a program of Rotary International to being a membership type of Rotary International, elevating its status to resemble that of Rotary clubs. As of 1 July 2020, Rotaract clubs can exist on their own, or may be sponsored by Rotary and/or Rotaract clubs. This makes them true "partners in service" and key members of the family of Rotary.[5] A Rotaract club may, but is not required to, establish upper age limits, provided that the club (in accordance with its bylaws) obtain the concurrence of its members and the sponsor club(s) (if sponsored).

In Hong Kong, there are 8 U-based universities joint to organize an annual camp for the committee members to participate. The camp is called Interflow.

Multidistrict communication and MDIOsEdit

 
Rotaract Club de Beyrouth members during the Gala Dinner of the 6th Rotaract District 2452 conference.

Rotaract multidistrict information organizations (MDIOs) function as regional resource centers for Rotaractors. They comprise Rotaract clubs in two or more districts, within a country or across several countries. MDIOs are formed to disseminate information and facilitate communication among Rotaract clubs in the participating districts.

Rotaract MDIOs are excellent ways for communicating program updates, local and international news, and event bulletins. They also facilitate uniting Rotaractors from different clubs and districts within a particular region.

MDIOs offer information in the form of publications, online services, and direct links with Rotary International (RI) staff. The Worldwide Rotaract Directory has information on specific names, districts, and contacts.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Rotaract Clubs". Rotary international. Retrieved September 20, 2020.
  2. ^ "Rotaract History". Rotary Global History Fellowship. Retrieved February 7, 2017.
  3. ^ "Rotaract Clubs Worldwide". Rotary international. Retrieved February 7, 2017.
  4. ^ Rotary international, 41.040. Rotaract. "Rotary Code of Policies".
  5. ^ "Recent Rotaract policy updates". My Rotary. Rotary International. November 2019. Retrieved 20 September 2020.

External linksEdit