Rosalind Franklin Award

The Royal Society Rosalind Franklin Award was established in 2003[1][2] and is awarded annually by the Royal Society to an individual for outstanding work in any field of Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) and to support the promotion of women in STEM. It is named in honour of Rosalind Franklin and initially funded by the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI)[1] and subsequently the Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills (DIUS) as part of its efforts to promote women in STEM. Women are a significantly underrepresented group in STEM making up less than 9% of the United Kingdom's full-time and part-time Professors in Science.[1][3] The award consists of a medal and a grant of £30,000,[4] and the recipient delivers a lecture as part of the Society's public lecture series, some of which are available on YouTube.[5][6][7][8][9]

Rosalind Franklin Award
Awarded forsupport the promotion of women in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics
Sponsored byRoyal Society
Date2003 (2003)[1]
LocationLondon
CountryUnited Kingdom
Presented byDepartment for Innovation, Universities and Skills Edit this on Wikidata
Reward(s)£30,000
Websiteroyalsociety.org/grants-schemes-awards/awards/rosalind-franklin-award/

LaureatesEdit

Rosalind Franklin Award CommitteeEdit

As of 2018 the Rosalind Franklin award committee (which takes the decision on the prize each year)[14] includes:

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e Lambert, Froniga (2003). "News: The Royal Society Rosalind Franklin Award". Notes and Records of the Royal Society. 57 (2): 265–266. doi:10.1098/rsnr.2003.0211. ISSN 0035-9149.
  2. ^ Anon (2017). "Royal Society Rosalind Franklin Award previous winners". docs.google.com. Royal Society. Retrieved 2015-10-29.
  3. ^ a b McDonald, Kenneth (2013). "Call to arms over sexism in science: A professor at Edinburgh University launches a project to call for equal numbers of male and female scientists". bbc.co.uk. London: BBC.
  4. ^ a b c Anon (2017). "The Royal Society Rosalind Franklin Award". Royal Society. Retrieved 2015-10-29.
  5. ^ a b Viding, Essi (2017). "Why do some people become psychopaths? Rosalind Franklin Award Lecture". youtube.com. Archived from the original on 2021-12-15.
  6. ^ a b Dunkley, Joanna (2016). "Our window on the Universe - Rosalind Franklin Lecture 2016". youtube.com. Archived from the original on 2021-12-15.
  7. ^ a b Carpenter, Lucy (2015). "What on Earth is happening to our atmosphere? Rosalind Franklin Award Lecture". youtube.com. Archived from the original on 2021-12-15.
  8. ^ a b McKendry, Rachel (2015). "Harnessing power of mobile phones and big data for global health". youtube.com. Archived from the original on 2021-12-15.
  9. ^ a b Blakemore, Sarah-Jayne (2013). "The teenage brain: Rosalind Franklin award lecture". youtube.com. Archived from the original on 2021-12-15.
  10. ^ "Royal Society Rosalind Franklin Award and Lecture | Royal Society". royalsociety.org. Retrieved 2020-08-13.
  11. ^ "Royal Society Rosalind Franklin Award and Lecture | Royal Society". royalsociety.org. Retrieved 2019-07-18.
  12. ^ Anon (2018). "Recipients of Royal Society medals and awards in 2018 announced". royalsociety.org. Royal Society.
  13. ^ Brown, Andrew (2003). "Award-winning synthetic chemist Susan Gibson". theguardian.com. The Guardian. Retrieved 11 April 2016.
  14. ^ "Rosalind Franklin Award Committee". royalsociety.org.