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Roots of Knowledge

Roots of Knowledge is a permanent stained glass display completed in 2016 at Utah Valley University (UVU) in Orem, Utah, United States. The creation of the exhibit was designed and overseen by stained glass artists Tom Holdman and Cameron Oscarson. It took over 12 years and cost US$4.5 million to complete.

Roots of Knowledge Q29505469 on Wikidata
Artist
  • Tom Holdman
  • Cameron Oscarson
Completion date November 18, 2016 (2016-11-18)
Medium Stained glass
Subject History of knowledge
Dimensions 3.0 m × 61 m (10 ft × 200 ft)[1]
Location Bingham Gallery, Fulton Library, Utah Valley University, Orem, Utah
Coordinates 40°16′51″N 111°43′01″W / 40.2807751°N 111.7169962°W / 40.2807751; -111.7169962Coordinates: 40°16′51″N 111°43′01″W / 40.2807751°N 111.7169962°W / 40.2807751; -111.7169962
Owner Utah Valley University
Website

Contents

DescriptionEdit

The Roots of Knowledge is a permanent stained glass exhibit in the Ira A. and Mary Lou Fulton Library at Utah Valley University in Orem, Utah in the United States.[2] It is 200 feet (61 m) long, about 10 feet (3.0 m) tall, and comprising 80 separate panes.[3] Each of the panels was handcrafted from 60,000 pieces of glass depicting part of the progress of human knowledge during recorded history.[4] The exhibit depicts both religious and secular events and objects.[5]

In addition to the stained glass used for most of the window, other objects were incorporated into the display. These included a shark's tooth, part of the Berlin Wall, a Purple Heart medal, a $5 bill from 1777, and glass from NASA.[2][3][6] Part of the window incorporates a replication of the oldest stained glass known: a window created in 647 AD at The Abbey Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul, Monkwearmouth–Jarrow in England.[4][7]

HistoryEdit

The idea to create the stained glass exhibit began in 2004. For the next 12 years, Holdman and Oscarson worked to design and create the 80 panels included in the final exhibit.[4] Each panel was handcrafted by the original designers, Tom Holdman and Cameron Oscarson, who worked with over 350 student artists, 26 faculty members, and 40 other artists during the construction of the exhibit.[2][4]

The US$4.5 million project was funded through private donations,[2][4] including through sponsorships of individual pieces of glass.[8] It was officially unveiled on November 18, 2016, as part of the 75th anniversary of the university.[3][9]

ReceptionEdit

The installation was described as a "tour de force" by the curator of ceramics and glass at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London.[4] The windows have been compared to those in several European cathedrals, including the Cologne Cathedral in Germany, Sainte-Chapelle in France, and York Minster in England.[4] The Utah Education Network worked with Holdman and UVU to create curriculum and field trips based on the project.[10]

The project is the subject of a one-hour documentary by Lee Groberg created for PBS.[11]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "About the Roots of Knowledge project at Utah Valley University". Utah Valley University. Archived from the original on April 19, 2017. Retrieved April 19, 2017. 
  2. ^ a b c d Means, Emily (November 11, 2016). "At Utah Valley University, it's one artful piece of stained glass at a time". Salt Lake Tribune. Archived from the original on April 19, 2017. Retrieved April 19, 2017. 
  3. ^ a b c St. Denis, Nick (July 24, 2015). "Utah Glass Art Project Telling Big Story in Big Way". USGlass News Network. Archived from the original on April 19, 2017. Retrieved April 19, 2017. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f g O'Hear, Natasha (December 8, 2016). "History illuminated: The evolution of knowledge told through 60,000 pieces of glass". CNN.com. Archived from the original on April 19, 2017. Retrieved April 19, 2017. 
  5. ^ Dallas, Kelsey (December 24, 2016). "Why stained glass works in sacred and secular spaces". Chattanooga Times Free Press. Archived from the original on April 19, 2017. Retrieved April 19, 2017. 
  6. ^ Dodson, Braley (November 18, 2016). "UVU unveils 'Roots of Knowledge' mural". Daily Herald. Archived from the original on April 19, 2017. Retrieved April 19, 2017. 
  7. ^ Espinosa, Carmen (October 25, 2016). "The Roots of Knowledge at Glaziers’ Art Fair". Seen London. Archived from the original on April 21, 2017. Retrieved April 21, 2017. 
  8. ^ "Explore the wall and find a piece of glass to sponsor". Retrieved April 19, 2017. 
  9. ^ Chen, Daphne (November 18, 2017). "Utah Valley University unveils massive stained glass installation". KSL.com. Archived from the original on April 19, 2017. Retrieved April 19, 2017. 
  10. ^ Dodson, Braley (October 21, 2016). "UEN, UVU partnering to create curriculum, field trips around 'Roots of Knowledge' stained glass mural". Daily Herald. Archived from the original on April 19, 2017. Retrieved April 19, 2017. 
  11. ^ "The Root's of Knowledge". Groberg Films. Archived from the original on April 19, 2017. Retrieved April 19, 2017.