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Romsey (UK Parliament constituency)

Coordinates: 51°00′14″N 1°29′28″W / 51.004°N 1.491°W / 51.004; -1.491

Romsey
Former County constituency
for the House of Commons
Outline map
Boundary of Romsey in Hampshire for the 2005 general election
Outline map
Location of Hampshire within England
CountyHampshire
19832010
Number of membersOne
Replaced byRomsey and Southampton North
Created fromEastleigh (fraction of), New Forest (fraction of)

Romsey was a seat of the House of Commons of the UK Parliament 1983–2010 which accordingly (as with all seats since 1950) elected one Member of Parliament (MP) by the first past the post system of election. It is virtually tantamount to its replacement Romsey and Southampton North which takes in two typical-size local government wards of the United Kingdom named after and approximate to the Bassett and Swaythling parts of Southampton.

BoundariesEdit

 
Romsey and Waterside in Hampshire 1983–1997

1983–1997: The Borough of Test Valley wards of Abbey, Blackwater, Chilworth and Nursling, Cuppernham, Field, North Baddesley, Romsey Extra, and Tadburn, and the District of New Forest wards of Blackfield and Langley, Colbury, Dibden and Hythe North, Dibden Purlieu, Fawley Holbury, Hythe South, Marchwood, Netley Marsh, Totton Central, Totton North, and Totton South.

1997–2010: The Borough of Test Valley wards of Abbey, Blackwater, Chilworth and Nursling, Cuppernham, Dun Valley, Field, Harewood, Kings Somborne and Michelmersh, Nether Wallop and Broughton, North Baddesley, Over Wallop, Romsey Extra, Stockbridge, and Tadburn, the Borough of Eastleigh wards of Chandler’s Ford, Hiltingbury East, and Hiltingbury West, and the City of Southampton ward of Bassett.

The constituency was approximate to the Test Valley district of Hampshire and covered a smaller area as parts of the north of Test Valley fell into part of the North West Hampshire seat to roughly ensure equal size electorates (low malapportionment). The main town within the constituency was Romsey.

HistoryEdit

The constituency was created in 1983 from parts of the seats of Eastleigh and New Forest. It was originally named Romsey and Waterside and included areas such as Hythe and Fawley on the west side of Southampton Water. In 1997 it lost the Waterside area and gained the Bassett Ward of the City of Southampton, and new territory in the north of the Test Valley district, and was consequently renamed to just Romsey. The first MP, Michael Colvin, held the constituency from its creation until his death in 2000. This led to a by-election, which was won by Liberal Democrat Sandra Gidley, who held the seat in the two subsequent General Elections.

Following their review of parliamentary representation in Hampshire, the Boundary Commission for England created a modified Romsey constituency called Romsey and Southampton North, to reflect the fact that two wards of Southampton form part of the constituency (though one ward had in fact formed part of the constituency since 1997).

Sandra Gidley lost to the Conservatives in the 2010 general election when she contested the new seat. She was succeeded by Caroline Nokes.

Members of ParliamentEdit

Election Member [1] Party Notes
1983 Michael Colvin Conservative constituency created as Romsey and Waterside, renamed Romsey in 1997
2000 by-election Sandra Gidley Liberal Democrat
2010 constituency abolished: see Romsey and Southampton North

ElectionsEdit

Elections in the 2000sEdit

General election 2005: Romsey[2]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Democrat Sandra Gidley 22,465 44.7 −2.3
Conservative Caroline Nokes 22,340 44.4 +2.3
Labour Matthew Stevens 4,430 8.8 +0.6
UKIP Michael Wigley 1,076 2.1 +0.6
Majority 125 0.2
Turnout 50,311 69.7 +2.5
Liberal Democrat hold Swing −2.3
General election 2001: Romsey[3]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Democrat Sandra Gidley 22,756 47.0 +17.5
Conservative Paul Raynes 20,386 42.1 −3.9
Labour Stephen Roberts 3,986 8.2 −10.3
UKIP Anthony McCabe 730 1.5 −2.0
Legalise Cannabis Derrick Large 601 1.2 N/A
Majority 2,370 4.9
Turnout 48,459 67.2 -9.2
Liberal Democrat hold Swing
By-election 2000: Romsey
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Democrat Sandra Gidley 19,571 50.6 +21.2
Conservative Tim Palmer 16,260 42.0 −4.0
Labour Andy Howard 1,451 3.7 −14.9
UKIP Garry Rankin-Moore 901 2.3 −1.2
Legalise Cannabis Derrick Large 417 1.1 +1.1
Independent Thomas Lamont 109 0.3 +0.3
Majority 3,311 8.6
Turnout 55.4
Liberal Democrat gain from Conservative Swing

Elections in the 1990sEdit

General election 1997: Romsey[4]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Michael Colvin 23,834 46.0 −17.2
Liberal Democrat Mark G. Cooper 15,249 29.4 +6.3
Labour Joanne V. Ford 9,623 18.6 +5.7
UKIP Alan Sked 1,824 3.5 N/A
Referendum Michael J.L. Wigley 1,291 2.5 N/A
Majority 8,585 16.57
Turnout 51,821 76.4
Conservative hold Swing
General election 1992: Romsey and Waterside[5]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Michael Colvin 37,375 54.4 −2.0
Liberal Democrat George Dawson 22,071 32.1 +0.1
Labour Angela Mawle 8,688 12.6 +1.1
Green John C.T. Spottiswood 577 0.8 N/A
Majority 15,304 22.3
Turnout 83.16
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1980sEdit

General election 1987: Romsey and Waterside[6]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Michael Colvin 35,303 56.4 −0.2
Social Democratic Alan Bloss 20,031 32.0 +0.9
Labour Stephen Roberts 7,213 11.5 −0.8
Majority 15,272 24.5
Turnout 79.0
Conservative hold Swing
General election 1983: Romsey and Waterside[7]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Michael Colvin 30,361 56.6 N/A
Social Democratic Alan Bloss 16,671 31.1 N/A
Labour M.W. Knight 6,604 12.3 N/A
Majority 13,690 25.5 N/A
Turnout 75.8 N/A
Conservative win (new seat)

See alsoEdit

Notes and referencesEdit

  1. ^ Leigh Rayment's Historical List of MPs – Constituencies beginning with "R" (part 2)
  2. ^ "Election Data 2005". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  3. ^ "Election Data 2001". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  4. ^ "Election Data 1997". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  5. ^ "Election Data 1992". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  6. ^ "Election Data 1987". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  7. ^ "Election Data 1983". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.