Robert Gibson (Ontario politician)

Robert Wayne Gibson (November 14, 1932 – March 26, 1966) was a politician in Ontario, Canada. He was a Liberal member of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario from 1962 to 1963 who represented the northwestern riding of Kenora. From 1963 to 1966 he sat as a Liberal-Labour member. He died in office after a short illness from an infection of the pancreas.

Robert Wayne Gibson
Ontario MPP
In office
1962–1966
Preceded byAlbert Wren
Succeeded byLeo Bernier
ConstituencyKenora
Personal details
Born(1932-11-14)November 14, 1932
Kenora, Ontario, Canada
DiedMarch 26, 1966(1966-03-26) (aged 33)
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Political partyLiberal, 1962-1963
Liberal-Labour, 1963-1966
Spouse(s)Marjorie
OccupationLawyer

BackgroundEdit

He was born in Kenora in 1932.[1] He spent his education at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario and later went to Osgoode Hall in Toronto. He returned to Kenora where he worked as a lawyer.[2]

OfficesEdit

Gibson ran as a Liberal candidate in the northern Ontario riding of Kenora which was called after the death of long-serving Liberal-Labour member Albert Wren. He defeated Progressive Conservative opponent Peter Robertson by 1,178 votes.[3] As a means of marginalizing the NDP candidate, in the 1963 general election, Gibson ran as a Liberal-Labour candidate and defeated the PC candidate, Leo Bernier, by 840 votes.[4] He served as an opposition member facing Progressive Conservative governments under Premier John Robarts.

Gibson was interested in native affairs and flew to several remote reserves to observe living conditions. He died on March 26, 1966 of a pancreas infection.[2]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Pierre G. Normandin; A. Léopold Normandin (1965). Canadian Parliamentary Guide. p. 666.
  2. ^ a b "Robert Gibson: Kenora MPP active worker for Indians". The Globe and Mail. March 28, 1966. p. 37.
  3. ^ "Liberals take 3 of 5 seats". Toronto Star. January 19, 1962. p. 1.
  4. ^ Canadian Press (September 26, 1963). "78 in Tory Blue Wave -- 23 Is All Grits Saved". The Windsor Star. Windsor, Ontario. p. 25.

External linksEdit