Rio Branco Football Club

Rio Branco Football Club, commonly referred to as Rio Branco, is a Brazilian professional club based in Rio Branco, Acre founded on 8 June 1919. It competes in the Campeonato Brasileiro Série D, the fourth tier of Brazilian football, as well as in the Campeonato Acreano, the top flight of the Acre state football league.

Rio Branco
Rio Branco Football Club logo.svg
Full nameRio Branco Football Club
Nickname(s)Estrelão (Big Star)
Alvirrubro (White and Red)
O Mais Querido (The Most Beloved)
Founded8 June 1919; 103 years ago (1919-06-08)
GroundArena da Floresta
Capacity20,000
PresidentJoaquim Alencar
Head coachIrani de Almeida
LeagueCampeonato Brasileiro Série D
Campeonato Acreano
2021Acreano, 1st of 9 (champions)

It is the most successful club in Acre, having won a record 47 state titles, 31 of those being won in the amateur era. Rio Branco also took part in the national league in 21 seasons, the most of any club from the state. It is also the first Northern Brazil and the only club from Acre to play in a continental cup, featuring in the 1997 Copa CONMEBOL after winning the Copa Norte in the same year.

Rio Branco's highest national league finish was achieved in 1989, when they finished 16th in the Brazilian Série B. The club's home colours are red and white and the team mascot is the Altaneira star, a symbol from the Acre state flag.

HistoryEdit

On June 8, 1919, the club was founded by the lawyer Luiz Mestrinho Filho, a relative of Governor Gilberto Mestrinho.[1]

In 1947, the club won the first state championship organized by the Acre State Football Federation.[2] From 1955 to 1957, Rio Branco won three state championships in a row.[2]

Rio Branco won the first edition of Copa Norte in 1997,[3] beating Remo of Pará state, in the final.[4] Rio Branco gained the right to compete in that year's Copa CONMEBOL. The club was eliminated in the first round of Copa CONMEBOL, by Deportes Tolima, of Colombia, after losing in the penalty shootout.[5] From 2002 to 2005, Rio Branco won four state championships in a row.[1]

Season recordsEdit

Season League Campeonato Brasileiro Copa do Brasil
Division Format P W D L F A Pts Pos Division P W D L F A Pts Pos
1999 A (g6*,g6*)-2 10 6 1 3 19 3rd
2000 A (g6*,g6*)-2 12 8 3 0 27 1st Green
Modul
12 5 3 4 20 16 18
2001 A (g6*,g6*)-2 12 6 2 3 29 11 20 2nd
2002 A g6 10 9 0 1 27 4 27 1st
2003 A (g7*,g7*)-2 12 10 2 0 32 1st C R32
2004 A 14 9 2 3 29 1st C QF 2nd round
2005 A (g5*,g5*)-2 13 9 3 1 30 1st 1st round
2006 A Tacas 10 6 1 3 19 12 19 2nd withdrew 1st round
2007 A (g7*;g7*)-2 12 10 2 0 47 11 32 1st C 6 3 1 2 9 7 10 3rd(R16) not qualified
2008 A (g8*;g6*)-2 13 12 0 1 42 15 36 1st C 14 5 1 8 25 30 16 8th(R8) 1st round
2009 A 2g5*-4-2* 6 4 2 0 16 7 14 2nd C 10 4 2 4 18 15 14 QF 1st round
2010 A g9*-4 13 11 1 1 40 17 34 1st C 8 2 4 2 12 17 10 4th(GS) not qualified
2011 A g8-4 18 12 2 4 42 22 38 1st C 1st round

StadiumEdit

Rio Branco currently plays in their home stadium, the Estádio José de Melo, which has a maximum capacity of 8,000 people.

The club also plays at Arena da Floresta, which has a maximum capacity of 20,000 people.

ColorsEdit

Rio Branco's official colors are red and white. Rio Branco's home kit is composed of a red shirt, red shorts and red socks.[1]

HonoursEdit

Winners (1): 1997
Winners (48): 1919, 1921, 1928, 1929, 1935, 1936, 1937, 1938, 1939, 1940, 1941, 1943, 1944, 1945, 1946, 1947, 1950, 1951, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1964, 1971, 1973, 1977, 1979, 1983, 1986, 1992, 1994, 1997, 2000, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2007, 2008, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2014, 2015, 2018, 2021
Winners (3): 1976, 1979, 1984

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c "Rio Branco Football Club". Arquivo de Clubes. Archived from the original on 1 January 2013. Retrieved 30 June 2007.
  2. ^ a b "Acre State League – List of Champions". RSSSF. Archived from the original on 21 June 2008. Retrieved 30 June 2007.
  3. ^ "Competições da Região Norte do Brasil". RSSSF. Archived from the original on 11 December 2006. Retrieved 30 June 2007.
  4. ^ "Brazil – Copa Norte 1997". RSSSF. Archived from the original on 20 August 2007. Retrieved 30 June 2007.
  5. ^ "Copa Conmebol 1997". RSSSF. Retrieved 30 June 2007.

External linksEdit