Relations between Japanese revolutionaries, the Comintern and the Soviet Union

Relations between Japanese revolutionaries, the Comintern and the Soviet Union existed from the 1920s until the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991.

HistoryEdit

The Comintern made first contact with Japanese revolutionaries in 1920. It helped establish the Japanese Communist Party.[1] Both the Comintern and the JCP had close relations. The JCP had financial ties with both the Comintern,[2] and the Soviet government.[3]

The Soviet Union solicited working-class Japanese to study at the Communist University of the Toilers of the East (KUTV),[4] known as "Kutobe" by the Japanese.[5]

Many Japanese activists who resided in the Soviet Union became victims of Stalin's Great Purge.[6]

The relationship between the JCP and the Soviet Union deteriorated by the 1960s, when Pro‐Chinese members became the majority of the party.[7]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Beckmann, George M., and Genji Okubo. The Japanese Communist Party 1922-1945. Stanford, Calif: Stanford University Press, 1969. pp 30-55
  2. ^ Tim, Rees, and Thorpe, Andrew. International Communism and the Communist International, 1919-43 Manchester University Press, 1998.
  3. ^ Yukiko Koshiro (2013). Imperial Eclipse: Japan's Strategic Thinking about Continental Asia before August 1945. Cornell University Press. pp. 15–45.
  4. ^ Yukiko Koshiro (2013). Imperial Eclipse: Japan's Strategic Thinking about Continental Asia before August 1945. Cornell University Press. p. 30.
  5. ^ Beckmann, George M., and Genji Okubo. The Japanese Communist Party 1922-1945. Stanford, Calif: Stanford University Press, 1969. pp 30-55
  6. ^ Kato, Tetsuro (July 2000). "The Japanese Victims of Stalinist Terror in the USSR" (PDF). Hitotsubashi Journal of Social Studies. 32 (1).
  7. ^ "4 JAPANESE REDS PLAN NEW GROUP - nytimes". New York Times. 1964-10-04.

Further readingEdit