Randolph–Macon Yellow Jackets

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The Randolph–Macon Yellow Jackets are the athletic teams that represent Randolph–Macon College, located in Ashland, Virginia, in NCAA Division III intercollegiate sports. The Yellow Jackets compete as members of the Old Dominion Athletic Conference. Altogether, Randolph–Macon sponsors 18 sports, with 9 teams for each sex. The school's newest sport of men's volleyball, introduced for the 2019 season (2018–19 school year), is the only team that does not compete in the ODAC, instead competing in the Continental Volleyball Conference. (The only other ODAC member with a varsity men's volleyball program, Eastern Mennonite, is also a CVC member.)[2]

Randolph–Macon Yellow Jackets
Logo
UniversityRandolph–Macon College
ConferenceOld Dominion Athletic Conference
NCAADivision III
Athletic directorJeff Burns
LocationAshland, Virginia
Varsity teams18
Football stadiumDay Field
Basketball arenaCrenshaw Gymnasium
Baseball stadiumHugh Stephens Field at Estes Park
Other arenasEstes Aquatic Center
NicknameYellow Jacket
ColorsLemon and Black[1]
         
Websitewww.rmcathletics.com

HistoryEdit

The school's main rival in men's sports over the past century has been Hampden-Sydney College. The football game between Randolph–Macon and Hampden-Sydney dates to the 19th century and is billed as the "Oldest Small-College Rivalry in the South". Randolph–Macon won the first contest 12–6 in 1893.

Varsity teamsEdit

 
Two Yellow Jackets women's lacrosse players in a match against the Christopher Newport Captains, 2015

List of teamsEdit

Individual teamsEdit

FootballEdit

In 1969 Randolph–Macon defeated the University of Bridgeport (Connecticut) 47–28 in the inaugural Knute Rockne Bowl laying claim to a shared College Division II National Championship with Wittenberg University (Springfield, Ohio) which had defeated William Jewell College in the first Amos Alonzo Stagg Bowl. The 4 teams had been chosen by the NCAA to compete in the first ever playoffs established for Division II schools. No complete playoff was set up until 1973. The 1969 football team was inducted into the college's Hall of Fame in 2004. The 1968 team with a perfect 9-0 record remains the only undefeated and untied football team in school history. The Yellow Jacket football team is currently coached by Pedro Arruza and won the ODAC championship in 2008, 2016 and 2018. As of Nov 2013 the football team had posted a record 7 seasons with a winning record under Coach Arruza. The football team plays its home games at Day Field.[3]

Year Round Opponent Result
1984 First Round Washington & Jefferson L, 21–22
2008 First Round Mount Union L, 0–56
2016 First Round Johns Hopkins L, 21–42
2018 First Round
Second Round
John Carroll
Muhlenberg
W, 23–20
L, 6–35
Playoff record 1–4

BasketballEdit

Randolph-Macon's basketball teams have had numerous successful seasons. The women's basketball team played in the NCAA Division III national championship game in the 2004–05 season, losing to Millikin University and finishing second in the nation. The men's basketball team has been ranked #1 in the country by D3hoops.com, most recently in the 2014-15 season, and earned a trip to the Final Four of the NCAA Division III tournament in 2010. The men's basketball program has made 24 NCAA tournament appearances while the women have appeared in 11 NCAA tournaments.

Women's volleyballEdit

R-MC won its fifth overall ODAC title and made its sixth NCAA appearance in 2016. In 2015 the team made an appearance in the Elite 8.

BaseballEdit

The school's baseball team have won the ODAC championship in 1979, 1987, 2008, 2011, 2013 and 2016. In the 2016 season, R-MC reached the Mideast Regional title game. The Yellow Jackets won the South Regional Championship in 2018 and made their first appearance at the College World Series in Appleton, Wisconsin.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Randolph–Macon College Logo & Identity Standards (PDF). Retrieved May 2, 2017.
  2. ^ "Randolph Macon To Join CVC" (Press release). Continental Volleyball Conference. October 14, 2017. Retrieved February 1, 2018.
  3. ^ "All-Time Division III Football Championship Records" (PDF). NCAA. NCAA.org. pp. 1–15. Retrieved January 24, 2015.

External linksEdit