Priority signs

Priority traffic signs indicate the order in which vehicles should pass intersection points. Vehicles often come into conflict with other vehicles and pedestrians because their intended courses of travel intersect, and thus interfere with each other's routes. The general principle that establishes who has the right to go first is called "right of way" or "priority". It establishes who has the right to use the conflicting part of the road and who has to wait until the other does so. The vehicle that does not need to wait is said to "have the right of way" or to "have priority."

Types of signEdit

 
A Give way sign in Hong Kong in both English and Traditional Chinese

A Give way sign, also known as a yield sign in some countries, informs the driver that they must give way to vehicles on the major road. Under the Vienna Convention, the standard sign should be a white or yellow inverted triangle with a red border.[1] This originates in Denmark, with the red and white coming from the Danish flag.[2] In some countries, the words Give Way or equivalent may be included with the sign. These signs are usually accompanied by a give way marking, normally one or multiple dashed lines or shark teeth across the carriageway.

Priority signs according to the Vienna Convention on Road Signs and Signals
Give Way Inverted equilateral triangle White or yellow Red 0.9 m (large), 0.6 m (small) None    
Stop Octagon Red White 0.9 m (large), 0.6 m (small) "STOP" written in white  
Circular White or yellow Red 0.9 m (large), 0.6 m (small) "STOP" written in black or dark blue inside red inverted triangle    
Priority road Diamond White Black 0.5 m (large), 0.35 m (small) Yellow or orange square    
End of priority road Diamond White Black 0.5 m (large), 0.35 m (small) Yellow or orange square with black or grey diagonal lines crossing the sign    
Priority for oncoming traffic Circular White or yellow Red Unspecified Black arrow indicating direction with priority, red arrow indicating direction without    
Priority over oncoming traffic Rectangle Blue None Unspecified White arrow indicating direction with priority, red arrow indicating direction without  

Alternative priority systemsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Road Traffic and Road Signs and Signals Agreements and Conventions | UNECE". unece.org. Retrieved 2021-09-12.
  2. ^ Bekendtgørelse om Hovedfærdselsaarer, 27. marts 1937, Denmark