Prentice ministry

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The Prentice Ministry was the combined Cabinet (called Executive Council of Alberta), chaired by 16th Premier of Alberta Jim Prentice, that governed Alberta from September 15, 2014 to May 24, 2015. It was made up of members of the Progressive Conservative Party (PC).

Prentice Ministry

16th ministry of Alberta
Jim Prentice in 2014
Date formedSeptember 15, 2014 (2014-09-15)
Date dissolvedMay 24, 2015 (2015-05-24)
People and organisations
MonarchElizabeth II
Lieutenant GovernorDonald Ethell
PremierJim Prentice
Member partyProgressive Conservative
Status in legislatureMajority
Opposition partyWildrose Party
Opposition leader
History
Legislature term28th Alberta Legislature
PredecessorHancock Ministry
SuccessorNotley Ministry

Cabinet composition and shuffles

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Prentice's cabinet was sworn in on September 15, 2014.[1] At 16 ministers and three associate ministers, it was significantly smaller than the Redford Ministry, which numbered 19 ministers and 10 assosciate ministers.[2] Prentice took two portfolios himself: international and intergovernmental relations and aboriginal relations.[1] Prentice dropped several high-profile ministers from cabinet, such as Doug Horner and Fred Horne, and brought in six new members: Gordon Dirks, David Dorward, Stephen Khan, Maureen Kubinec, Stephen Mandel and Ric McIver. Dirks, a former Calgary school board chair, and Mandel, former mayor of Edmonton, were not MLAs at the time of their appointment, becoming the first unelected cabinet ministers in Alberta since the 1930s. Prentice defended their appointments, saying "bringing in new government means bringing in new blood", and stressed that they would run in by-elections before the legislature resumed.[3] Of the ten cabinet ministers who were held over from the Hancock and Redford ministries, six were moved to new portfolios and four — Naresh Bhardwaj, Jonathan Denis, Wayne Drysdale and Verlyn Olson — stayed put.[3]

On April 25, 2015, in the middle of the 2015 Alberta general election, Jonathan Denis resigned as justice minister due to "legal proceedings" against him by his estranged wife. Prentice asked for Denis' resignation due to the involvement of the courts. Agriculture minister Verlyn Olson took over the justice portfolio in an acting capacity.[4]

List of ministers

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Name Date Appointed Date Departed
Jim Prentice President of the Executive Council (Premier) September 15, 2014 May 24, 2015
Robin Campbell President of Treasury Board and Minister of Finance September 15, 2014 May 23, 2015
Jim Prentice Minister of Aboriginal Relations September 15, 2014 May 23, 2015
Maureen Kubinec Minister of Culture and Tourism September 15, 2014 May 23, 2015
Gordon Dirks Minister of Education September 15, 2014 May 23, 2015
Frank Oberle Jr. Minister of Energy September 15, 2014 May 23, 2015
Kyle Fawcett Minister of Environment and Sustainable Resource Development September 15, 2014 May 23, 2015
Stephen Mandel Minister of Health September 15, 2014 May 23, 2015
Heather Klimchuk Minister of Human Services September 15, 2014 May 23, 2015
Manmeet Bhullar Minister of Infrastructure September 15, 2014 May 23, 2015
Don Scott Minister of Innovation and Advanced Education September 15, 2014 May 23, 2015
Jim Prentice Minister of International and Intergovernmental Relations September 15, 2014 May 23, 2015
Ric McIver Minister of Jobs, Skills, Training and Labour September 15, 2014 May 23, 2015
Jonathan Denis Minister of Justice and Solicitor General May 8, 2012 April 25, 2015
Diana McQueen Minister of Municipal Affairs September 15, 2014 May 23, 2015
Jeff Johnson Minister of Seniors September 15, 2014 May 23, 2015
Stephen Khan Minister of Service Alberta September 15, 2014 May 23, 2015
David Dorward Associate Minister of Aboriginal Relations September 15, 2014 May 23, 2015
Everett McDonald Associate Minister of Agriculture and Rural Development March 17, 2015 May 23, 2015
Teresa Woo-Paw Associate Minister of Asia Pacific Relations September 15, 2014 May 23, 2015

See also

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References

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  1. ^ a b Parrish, Julia (September 15, 2014). "Jim Prentice's new cabinet unveiled". Edmonton. Retrieved July 23, 2022.
  2. ^ "Alberta reacts to Premier Prentice's new cabinet | Globalnews.ca". Global News. Retrieved July 23, 2022.
  3. ^ a b Mertz, Emily (September 15, 2014). "Jim Prentice's cabinet: Who's in and who's out? | Globalnews.ca". Global News. Retrieved July 23, 2022.
  4. ^ "Jonathan Denis resigns as justice minister amid 'legal proceedings'". CBC News. April 25, 2015. Retrieved July 23, 2022.