Polish Cultural Institute in London

Polish Cultural Institute in London - Polish cultural institution in the capital of the United Kingdom under the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Poland.[1]

Polish Cultural Institute in London
Instytut Polski w Londynie
Address10 Bouverie Street
London EC4Y 8AX
Coordinates51°30′48″N 0°06′29″W / 51.513427°N 0.1081874°W / 51.513427; -0.1081874Coordinates: 51°30′48″N 0°06′29″W / 51.513427°N 0.1081874°W / 51.513427; -0.1081874
Websitehttps://instytutpolski.pl/london/

ActivitiesEdit

The main purpose of the Institute is to fulfil the tasks of public diplomacy, i.e. to maintain good social, scientific and cultural relations between Poland and Great Britain.[2] The Institute organizes exhibitions, concerts, film screenings, book promotions, book translations, coordinates scientific and cultural exchange. The aim of the Institute is to disseminate knowledge about Poland: culture, art, science, history, economy, politics, sociology. The Institute's activity is also partly directed to the Polish community in the United Kingdom.

The Institute was established in 1938, but the first director was appointed 10 years later. From 2014, its seat is located on 10 Bouverie Street.[3] Before that, it was located at 52-53 Poland Street. Previously, it was located at 34 Portland Place[4] and 16 Devonshire Street. During the communist era, the Institute was boycotted by the British and the Polish community. Since 2003 the Institute has been organizing the Polish Film Festival "Kinoteka".[5]

DirectorsEdit

  • 1948–1951 – Antoni Słonimski[6]
  • 1962–1964 – Tadeusz Wujek
  • 1964–1969 – Osman Achmatowicz[7]
  • 1969–1972 – Grzegorz Leopold Seidler[7]
  • 1972-1974 – Tadeusz Cieślak
  • 1974–1978 – Ernest Bryll
  • 1979–1985 – Irena Gabor-Jatczak
  • 1985–1993 – Karol Drozd[8]
  • 1993–1997 – Hanna Mausch[4]
  • 1998–1999 – Aleksandra Czapiewska, Elżbieta Łyszkowska, Barbara Kościelny p.o.
  • 2000–2001 – Joanna Wróblewska
  • 2002–2005 – Joanna Stachyra
  • 2005–2009 – Paweł Potoroczyn
  • 2009–2013 – Roland Chojnacki[9]
  • 2013–2016 – Anna Godlewska
  • 2016–2019 – Robert Szaniawski
  • od 1 lipca 2019 – Marta de Zuniga

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Kokowicz, Dorota (2019-01-17). The Depiction of Poland and Poles in The Daily Telegraph, 2007-2010. Cambridge Scholars Publishing. ISBN 978-1-5275-2607-5.
  2. ^ "About Us". Instytut Polski w Londynie. Retrieved 2020-11-24.
  3. ^ Schultz, Benjamin (2015-12-08). Singing in Polish: A Guide to Polish Lyric Diction and Vocal Repertoire. Rowman & Littlefield. ISBN 978-1-4422-3023-1.
  4. ^ a b Sinclair, Iain; Lichtenstein, Rachel (2014-10-02). Rodinsky's Room. Granta Books. ISBN 978-1-78378-144-7.
  5. ^ kinoteka.org.uk https://kinoteka.org.uk/. Retrieved 2020-11-24. {{cite web}}: Missing or empty |title= (help)
  6. ^ Magill, Frank Northen (1984). Critical Survey of Poetry: Foreign Language Series. Salem Press. ISBN 978-0-89356-354-7.
  7. ^ a b García, Óscar J. Martín; Magnúsdóttir, Rósa (2019-04-01). Machineries of Persuasion: European Soft Power and Public Diplomacy during the Cold War. Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG. ISBN 978-3-11-056051-0.
  8. ^ Gallery, Dulwich Picture (1992). Treasures of a Polish King: Stanislaus Augustus as Patron and Collector. Dulwich Picture Gallery. ISBN 9780950156460.
  9. ^ Murawska-Muthesius, Katarzyna; Zarzecka, Natalia (2011). Kantor was Here: Tadeusz Kantor in Great Britain. Black Dog. ISBN 978-1-907317-32-3.

External linksEdit