Plus JEDEN DEŇ is a daily newspaper in Slovak language published by the company SPOLOČNOSŤ 7 PLUS. Its title literally means Plus One Day in English.[1]

HistoryEdit

The company SPOLOČNOSŤ 7 PLUS was started in 1990 by three individuals from Slovakia.[1] The paper was established in September 2006.[2] It is one of multiple publications by the company including Plus 7 dní, Šarm, and Báječná žena.[1]

On 28 March 2008, Plus JEDEN DEŇ protested against a law which it said would curb freedom of the press by publishing a paper with its front page blank except for a summary of criticisms of the proposed regulation.[3] The legislation arose out of a European Union treaty and was controversial when proposed in the Parliament in Slovakia.[3] When the law passed, the paper again printed a blank front page on 11 April 2008, save for a few lines which stated: "Dear readers, the parliament passed a media law that severely hits press freedom and editorial independence. It aims against the interests of the citizens and readers."[4] The paper criticized that the law, which mandated publication of reader opinions, would flood the media to the point of creating laborious inefficiencies.[3]

ReceptionEdit

In his book Media Law in Slovakia, author Andrej Školkay called Plus JEDEN DEŇ part of, "the second most important media house" in Slovakia.[1] Peter Barrer wrote in an article for the Journal of New Zealand & Pacific Studies that it was among "Slovakia's foremost print media outlets".[5]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d Andrej Školkay (2011). Media Law in Slovakia. Kluwer Law International. pp. 29–31. ISBN 978-9041134394.
  2. ^ Andrej Školkay (2007). "The Slovakian Media Landscape". In Georgios Terzis (ed.). European Media Governance: National and Regional Dimensions. Intellect Books.
  3. ^ a b c "Slovak newspapers use identical front pages to condemn proposed new media legislation, EU". The Associated Press News Service. Bratislava. 27 March 2008.
  4. ^ "Slovak newspapers condemn new media law, EU". Associated Press. Bratislava. 11 April 2008.
  5. ^ Peter Barrer (1 April 2013). "A necessarily better place: Images of New Zealand in the Slovak mass media". Journal of New Zealand & Pacific Studies. 1 (1): 5–21. doi:10.1386/nzps.1.1.5_1.

Further readingEdit

External linksEdit