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Phys.org is a science, research and technology news aggregator where much of content is republished directly from press releases and news agencies-in a practice known as churnalism.[1][2][3][4][5] It also produces some science journalism.[6][7][8] It shares many similarities with ScienceDaily and EurekAlert! in the sense that all of them practice heavy churnalism. [footnote 1]

Phys.org
phys.org logo
Type of site
Science News
Available in English
Website phys.org
Registration Optional
Current status Online

In April 2011 Phys.org started the site Medical Xpress for its content about medicine and health.[9]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Shipman, W. Matthew (2015). Handbook for Science Public Information Officers. University of Chicago Press. ISBN 9780226179469. 
  2. ^ Timmer, John (23 September 2009). "PR or science journalism? It's getting harder to tell". Ars Technica. 
  3. ^ Yong, Ed (11 January 2010). "Adapting to the new ecosystem of science journalism". National Geographic Phenomena. 
  4. ^ Choi, Charles Q. (January 24, 2012). "From the Writer s Desk: The Dangers of Press Releases". Scientific American Blog Network. 
  5. ^ Shipman, Matt (16 April 2014). "The News Release Is Dead, Long Live the News Release". Science Communication Breakdown. 
  6. ^ Susan Chenelle, Audrey Fisch (2016). Connecting Across Disciplines: Collaborating with Informational Text. Rowman & Littlefield. ISBN 1475820291. 
  7. ^ Henry, Alan. "How to Determine If A Controversial Statement Is Scientifically True". Lifehacker. 
  8. ^ Ngumbi, Esther. "Scientists Should Talk Directly to the Public". Scientific American Blog Network. Retrieved July 10, 2017. 
  9. ^ "Press Release: PhysOrg.com Spins Off Medical News Channel to Create Medical Xpress". PhysOrg via PRWeb. December 15, 2011. 

NotesEdit

  1. ^ EurekaAlert! though self-describes itself as hosting press releases.

External linksEdit