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Pete Smith (announcer)

Peter Philip Smith OAM (born 29 May 1939 in Melbourne, Victoria) is an Australian radio and television voice-over artist. He is primarily known for his work with GTV-9 Melbourne as their announcer, including being the announcer on the nationally screened quiz show Sale of the Century for twenty-one years.

Pete Smith
Born
Peter Philip Smith

(1939-05-29) 29 May 1939 (age 79)
Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
NationalityAustralian
OccupationTelevision and radio announcer
Years active1964-2011
EmployerNine Network

Contents

BiographyEdit

Early lifeEdit

Peter was educated at Wesley College, Melbourne.

RadioEdit

Upon leaving school, Smith joined the Australian Broadcasting Corporation as a messenger boy before progressing through the ranks to an announcer on the home service and Radio Australia.

On radio in the 1960s, Pete worked with radio station 3AK as a "Good Guy" and with Bert Newton on the Greater 3UZ as it was known during the seventies. From 1995 to 1998, he was a regular voice-over announcer on the national drive-time show Martin/Molloy alongside comedians Tony Martin and Mick Molloy.

Since this time he has made guest appearances on comedy-based radio programmes, including Get This with Tony Martin and Tough Love with Mick Molloy, both aired on Triple M.

TelevisionEdit

As television was introduced into Australia, Smith performed the role of announcer and host for the weekly ABC TV television program Sports View Hit Parade, broadcast on Saturday afternoons.

On 11 April 1964, Smith took up a position at the local Melbourne Nine Network station GTV-9. There he worked on voice-overs and appeared in Graham Kennedy’s In Melbourne Tonight, for which he presented commercials, appeared in comedy sketches, and, on several occasions, acted as compere. From the mid-60s, following Bert Newton's transfer to a rival network, Smith took over as chief voice-over announcer at GTV-9, a position he would retain for around forty years.[1]

During his time at the network, Smith has also been seen as on-camera host for numerous specials, as well as working for a period in the seventies as a National Nine newsreader. He was also associated for many years with network personality Bert Newton on the long running New Faces talent show, and on Bert’s night-time variety program. During the late seventies, Smith also hosted his own Tonight Show on NWS-9 in Adelaide.

1979 saw Peter Smith awarded the Douglas Wilkie Medal for doing the least for Australian rules football in the fairest manner.

Staying with the Nine Network, Pete was involved with Ernie Sigley and Denise Drysdale on their weekday morning program Ernie & Denise. From 1980, Smith became the voice-over man for the popular quiz program, Sale of the Century. His voice boomed out for twenty-one years welcoming viewers to the show each night until its demise in 2001. His announcement at the end of the show usually finished with the phrase "Pete Smith speaking".

He went on to become the spokesman for Australian retailer Copperart, appearing in numerous commercials during the 1980s and 1990s.

In the early 1990s Smith made several appearances on The Late Show on ABC-TV, having formed an association with some members of the creators of the show, The D-Generation, when they filmed several ultimately rejected pilot episodes of programs at Nine. Smith's most memorable performance on The Late Show was performing the Aerosmith song "Dude Looks Like A Lady". He also made a guest appearance during the mid-1990s on the current affairs spoof Frontline, also created by former members of The D-Generation and screened on the ABC.

Smith's later roles with Nine were warming up and giving announcements to the studio audience for Bert's Family Feud and Sale of the Century's revival, Temptation, although he did not appear on the show's broadcast (except for one episode in September 2007 to introduce a contestant, which included an on-camera appearance). In 2007, he was the announcer for Mick Molloy's short-lived The Nation. In 2011 he was the guest on the seventh episode of Tony Martin's comedy program, The Joy of Sets.

Other worksEdit

In film he appeared in Crackerjack (as a passerby) and Bad Eggs (as a police officer). During the 1990s he was the voiceover man for television advertisements for the Australian homewares chain Copperart, and had a small stint on the ill-fated Nine Network variety show Micallef Tonight parodying his usual voice over work, announcing joke prizes for their game show segment (describing an ugly couch as "a welcome subtraction from any living-room" and guests' choice to fly by aeroplane with the question "why risk death by ballooning or being fired from a giant cannon when aeroplanes are available?"), and insulting the contestants.

He has also performed in cabaret with Tony Martin, Mick Molloy and Judith Lucy and released two nostalgic double CD’s, Pete Smith Specialties: The Great British Dance Bands Of The Thirties and Pete Smith Specialties: The Great British Dance Bands Of The Forties,[2] containing his favourite popular music featuring classic British Dance bands of the 1930s and 1940s.

Now in semi-retirement, Pete splits his time between his homes in both Melbourne and the bayside village of Portsea.

Community workEdit

Smith is currently chairman and patron of the GTV Foundation.

He is also a Life Ambassador for Australia Day.[3]

AwardsEdit

  • Medal of the Order of Australia, 14 June 2004. Awarded "for service to the community, particularly through voluntary promotional assistance to charitable organisations".[4]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Happy 70th Pete Smith! | TV Tonight 29 May 2009. Retrieved 30 March 2013
  2. ^ National Film and Sound Archive, Commonwealth of Australia (2006-06-01). "Shop Catalogue Entry – Pete Smith Specialties – The Great British Dance Bands Of The Thirties Volume 1". Retrieved 2007-03-13.[dead link]
  3. ^ Australia Day (Victoria) | Retrieved 30 March 2013 Archived 28 September 2011 at the Wayback Machine.
  4. ^ Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet, Commonwealth of Australia (2006-12-12). "It's an Honour Record – Pete Philip Smith". Retrieved 2007-03-13.

External linksEdit