Paul Jack "Lefty" Courty (September 14, 1925 – December 10, 2008),[1] from Windsor, Missouri,[2] was an American basketball player who had a successful career at the University of Oklahoma from 1945 to 1949. He then played in the Amateur Athletic Union (AAU) for the Phillips 66ers despite being selected in the 1949 BAA draft by the Providence Steamrollers.[3]

Paul Courty
Paul Courty.jpg
Courty with the Phillips 66ers.
Personal information
Born(1925-09-14)September 14, 1925
Missouri
DiedDecember 10, 2008(2008-12-10) (aged 83)
Tampa, Florida
NationalityAmerican
Listed height6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)
Listed weight187 lb (85 kg)
Career information
CollegeOklahoma (1945–1949)
NBA draft1949 / Round: – / Pick: –
Selected by the Providence Steamrollers
Playing career1949–1952
PositionForward
Career history
1949–1952Phillips 66ers
Career highlights and awards

Courty was a three-time all-conference selection while an Oklahoma Sooner.[4] As a sophomore in 1946–47, he was a key player on the squad that advance to the 1947 NCAA national championship game before losing to Holy Cross. Courty led the team in scoring in his final two seasons, both of which saw him get named an NCAA All-American.[4]

Professionally, he decided to pursue a career playing for the Phillips 66ers, a powerful AAU squad during the mid-20th century.[5] He played for three seasons before calling it quits in July 1952.[5] Courty remained at the Phillips Petroleum Company, the company sponsoring the 66ers, in a professional capacity after his basketball career ended.[5]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Paul Jack Courty (1925–2008)". AncientFaces.com. Genealogy Bank. 2008. Retrieved September 16, 2014.
  2. ^ "1947–48 OU Men's Basketball Media Guide" (PDF). University of Oklahoma. 1947. Retrieved September 16, 2014.
  3. ^ "1949 BAA Draft". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved September 16, 2014.
  4. ^ a b "2008–09 OU Men's Basketball Media Guide" (PDF). University of Oklahoma. 2008. Retrieved September 16, 2014.
  5. ^ a b c Dobbins, Walt (July 4, 1952). "I May Be Wrong". Lincoln Evening Journal. p. 16. Retrieved September 16, 2014 – via Newspapers.com.